Factors Influencing the 24‐Hour Posttransfusion Survival and the Oxygen Transport Function of Previously Frozen Red Cells Preserved with 40 Per Cent W/V Glycerol and Frozen at —80 C

Factors Influencing the 24‐Hour Posttransfusion Survival and the Oxygen Transport Function of... A 6.2 M glycerol solution was added directly to concentrated red blood cells before storage at — 80 C for at least two and one‐half years. The glycerol was removed from the thawed red blood cells by one of four different washing procedures, and the washed cells were stored at 4 C for an additional 24 hours before transfusion. Recovery in vitro was about 90 per cent, and the posttransfusion survival was about 85 per cent. The CPD anticoagulant maintained the oxygen transport much better than ACD during storage of the red blood cells at 4 C for one week prior to freezing. Results were similar whether glycerolized red blood cells were washed in reusable stainless steel bowls, disposable polycarbonate bowls, or collapsible disposable polyvinylchloride plastic bags. The composition of the wash solution had no significant effect on the posttransfusion survival or oxygen transport function. When the washed red blood cells were stored in a sodium chloride‐glucose‐phosphate solution at 4 C for 24 hours before transfusion, the 24‐hour posttransfusion survival and oxygen transport function was satisfactory. Freeze‐preservation of red blood cells with hematocrits of about 40 V per cent and postthaw storage at 4 C for 24 hours resulted in an accumulation of supernatant hemoglobin and extracellular potassium. At the time of transfusion, the red blood cells were concentrated by centrifugation, the supernatant medium was removed, and the hematocrit adjusted to 70 V per cent. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Transfusion Wiley

Factors Influencing the 24‐Hour Posttransfusion Survival and the Oxygen Transport Function of Previously Frozen Red Cells Preserved with 40 Per Cent W/V Glycerol and Frozen at —80 C

Transfusion, Volume 14 (1) – Jan 2, 1974

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1974 AABB
ISSN
0041-1132
eISSN
1537-2995
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1537-2995.1974.tb04478.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A 6.2 M glycerol solution was added directly to concentrated red blood cells before storage at — 80 C for at least two and one‐half years. The glycerol was removed from the thawed red blood cells by one of four different washing procedures, and the washed cells were stored at 4 C for an additional 24 hours before transfusion. Recovery in vitro was about 90 per cent, and the posttransfusion survival was about 85 per cent. The CPD anticoagulant maintained the oxygen transport much better than ACD during storage of the red blood cells at 4 C for one week prior to freezing. Results were similar whether glycerolized red blood cells were washed in reusable stainless steel bowls, disposable polycarbonate bowls, or collapsible disposable polyvinylchloride plastic bags. The composition of the wash solution had no significant effect on the posttransfusion survival or oxygen transport function. When the washed red blood cells were stored in a sodium chloride‐glucose‐phosphate solution at 4 C for 24 hours before transfusion, the 24‐hour posttransfusion survival and oxygen transport function was satisfactory. Freeze‐preservation of red blood cells with hematocrits of about 40 V per cent and postthaw storage at 4 C for 24 hours resulted in an accumulation of supernatant hemoglobin and extracellular potassium. At the time of transfusion, the red blood cells were concentrated by centrifugation, the supernatant medium was removed, and the hematocrit adjusted to 70 V per cent.

Journal

TransfusionWiley

Published: Jan 2, 1974

References

  • Long‐term frozen storage of human red blood cells: studies in vivo and in vitro of autologous red blood cells preserved up to six years with high concentrations of glycerol
    Valeri, Valeri; Runck, Runck

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