Face Validity in the Context of Personnel Selection: A multimedia Approach

Face Validity in the Context of Personnel Selection: A multimedia Approach Face Validity in the Context of Personnel Selection: A Multimedia Approach Allison Shotland*, George M. Alliger and Tom Sales Introduction The utility of a job selection technique (such as a newly developed selection test) is frequently judged by the degree to which it successfully identifies the `best' candidates from an applicant pool. To the degree that it accomplishes such a task, a test is considered to be a `good' or `useful' selection procedure. This is the approach of most validation and utility analyses. Such analyses assume that the benefits provided for the organization by a selection method are a simple function of its ability to identify applicants with a superior chance of success on the job. That is, the usefulness of a procedure is typically obtained via a statistical extrapolation of a criterion-related validation study. Results of such analyses may be stated in different ways: in costbenefit terms (e.g., Net Present Value, Return on Investment) or in performance gains (e.g., per cent of incumbents performing above average). Clearly, organizational decision-makers need such `hard' information about current or proposed selection techniques. Nevertheless, such a classic validity/utility emphasis ignores perhaps half of the information necessary to completely judge a selection http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Selection and Assessment Wiley

Face Validity in the Context of Personnel Selection: A multimedia Approach

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0965-075X
eISSN
1468-2389
DOI
10.1111/1468-2389.00081
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Face Validity in the Context of Personnel Selection: A Multimedia Approach Allison Shotland*, George M. Alliger and Tom Sales Introduction The utility of a job selection technique (such as a newly developed selection test) is frequently judged by the degree to which it successfully identifies the `best' candidates from an applicant pool. To the degree that it accomplishes such a task, a test is considered to be a `good' or `useful' selection procedure. This is the approach of most validation and utility analyses. Such analyses assume that the benefits provided for the organization by a selection method are a simple function of its ability to identify applicants with a superior chance of success on the job. That is, the usefulness of a procedure is typically obtained via a statistical extrapolation of a criterion-related validation study. Results of such analyses may be stated in different ways: in costbenefit terms (e.g., Net Present Value, Return on Investment) or in performance gains (e.g., per cent of incumbents performing above average). Clearly, organizational decision-makers need such `hard' information about current or proposed selection techniques. Nevertheless, such a classic validity/utility emphasis ignores perhaps half of the information necessary to completely judge a selection

Journal

International Journal of Selection and AssessmentWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1998

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