Eye‐specific segregation and differential fasciculation of developing retinal ganglion cell axons in the mouse visual pathway

Eye‐specific segregation and differential fasciculation of developing retinal ganglion cell... Prior to forming and refining synaptic connections, axons of projection neurons navigate long distances to their targets. While much is known about guidance cues for axon navigation through intermediate choice points, whether and how axons are organized within tracts is less clear. Here we analyze the organization of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons in the developing mouse retinogeniculate pathway. RGC axons are organized by both eye‐specificity and topography in the optic nerve and tract: ipsilateral RGC axons are segregated from contralateral axons and are offset laterally in the tract relative to contralateral axon topographic position. To identify potential cell‐autonomous factors contributing to the segregation of ipsilateral and contralateral RGC axons in the visual pathway, we assessed their fasciculation behavior in a retinal explant assay. Ipsilateral RGC neurites self‐fasciculate more than contralateral neurites in vitro and maintain this difference in the presence of extrinsic chiasm cues. To further probe the role of axon self‐association in circuit formation in vivo, we examined RGC axon organization and fasciculation in an EphB1−/− mutant, in which a subset of ipsilateral RGC axons aberrantly crosses the midline but targets the ipsilateral zone in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus on the opposite side. Aberrantly crossing axons retain their association with ipsilateral axons in the contralateral tract, indicating that cohort‐specific axon affinity is maintained independently of guidance signals present at the midline. Our results provide a comprehensive assessment of RGC axon organization in the retinogeniculate pathway and suggest that axon self‐association contributes to pre‐target axon organization. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Comparative Neurology Wiley

Eye‐specific segregation and differential fasciculation of developing retinal ganglion cell axons in the mouse visual pathway

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0021-9967
eISSN
1096-9861
D.O.I.
10.1002/cne.24392
Publisher site
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Abstract

Prior to forming and refining synaptic connections, axons of projection neurons navigate long distances to their targets. While much is known about guidance cues for axon navigation through intermediate choice points, whether and how axons are organized within tracts is less clear. Here we analyze the organization of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons in the developing mouse retinogeniculate pathway. RGC axons are organized by both eye‐specificity and topography in the optic nerve and tract: ipsilateral RGC axons are segregated from contralateral axons and are offset laterally in the tract relative to contralateral axon topographic position. To identify potential cell‐autonomous factors contributing to the segregation of ipsilateral and contralateral RGC axons in the visual pathway, we assessed their fasciculation behavior in a retinal explant assay. Ipsilateral RGC neurites self‐fasciculate more than contralateral neurites in vitro and maintain this difference in the presence of extrinsic chiasm cues. To further probe the role of axon self‐association in circuit formation in vivo, we examined RGC axon organization and fasciculation in an EphB1−/− mutant, in which a subset of ipsilateral RGC axons aberrantly crosses the midline but targets the ipsilateral zone in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus on the opposite side. Aberrantly crossing axons retain their association with ipsilateral axons in the contralateral tract, indicating that cohort‐specific axon affinity is maintained independently of guidance signals present at the midline. Our results provide a comprehensive assessment of RGC axon organization in the retinogeniculate pathway and suggest that axon self‐association contributes to pre‐target axon organization.

Journal

The Journal of Comparative NeurologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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