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Experiencing Creating and Creativity in the Classroom

Experiencing Creating and Creativity in the Classroom Volume 25 Number 2 Second Quarter 1991 The instructions to the students for the first half of the exercise are: (a) have the students divide their pile of toys (objects) into two categories. Once everyone has done this, (b) have each student name his or her categories and (c) write all the categories on the blackboard. Some students will naturally identify the same category. Examples are: square or round; for play or for work; paper or plastic; having lived or never having lived. Throughout the entire experience, the students keep and work with the same pile of objects with which they start. Then have the students again divide the same pile of objects into two new . categories which have yet not been written on the blackboard and write the new categories on the blackboard. Repeat the procedure five to six more times. Each repetition may take a little longer because the categories may be less obvious, though this is not always the case. Students often start with the most obvious categories such as the uses of the objects, their relative sizes,their shapes, their origin (manmade or natural), their ability to move independently or not, where they live http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Creative Behavior Wiley

Experiencing Creating and Creativity in the Classroom

The Journal of Creative Behavior , Volume 25 (2) – Jun 1, 1991

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1991 Creative Education Foundation
ISSN
0022-0175
eISSN
2162-6057
DOI
10.1002/j.2162-6057.1991.tb01366.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Volume 25 Number 2 Second Quarter 1991 The instructions to the students for the first half of the exercise are: (a) have the students divide their pile of toys (objects) into two categories. Once everyone has done this, (b) have each student name his or her categories and (c) write all the categories on the blackboard. Some students will naturally identify the same category. Examples are: square or round; for play or for work; paper or plastic; having lived or never having lived. Throughout the entire experience, the students keep and work with the same pile of objects with which they start. Then have the students again divide the same pile of objects into two new . categories which have yet not been written on the blackboard and write the new categories on the blackboard. Repeat the procedure five to six more times. Each repetition may take a little longer because the categories may be less obvious, though this is not always the case. Students often start with the most obvious categories such as the uses of the objects, their relative sizes,their shapes, their origin (manmade or natural), their ability to move independently or not, where they live

Journal

The Journal of Creative BehaviorWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1991

References