Expected minimum population size as a measure of threat

Expected minimum population size as a measure of threat Risks of population decline are studied extensively in conservation biology, but are difficult to estimate because they change abruptly over a relatively narrow range of parameters. We propose that risks of decline may be usefully summarized by the expected minimum population size. This is the smallest population size that is expected to occur within a particular time period. Analytical solutions for the expected minimum population size are obtained for a stochastic population model of exponential growth. In more complex models that are analyzed by Monte Carlo simulation, the expected minimum population size may be determined by recording the smallest population size obtained in each iteration and taking the average of these values. Whereas risks of decline change abruptly with changes in parameter values, the expected minimum population size changes more gradually. The results demonstrate that the expected minimum population size provides a better indication of the propensity for decline than the risk of extinction (or risk of decline to some other small population size), especially when the risk of extinction is small. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Animal Conservation Wiley

Expected minimum population size as a measure of threat

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/expected-minimum-population-size-as-a-measure-of-threat-rgmORhPYtI
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Risks of population decline are studied extensively in conservation biology, but are difficult to estimate because they change abruptly over a relatively narrow range of parameters. We propose that risks of decline may be usefully summarized by the expected minimum population size. This is the smallest population size that is expected to occur within a particular time period. Analytical solutions for the expected minimum population size are obtained for a stochastic population model of exponential growth. In more complex models that are analyzed by Monte Carlo simulation, the expected minimum population size may be determined by recording the smallest population size obtained in each iteration and taking the average of these values. Whereas risks of decline change abruptly with changes in parameter values, the expected minimum population size changes more gradually. The results demonstrate that the expected minimum population size provides a better indication of the propensity for decline than the risk of extinction (or risk of decline to some other small population size), especially when the risk of extinction is small.

Journal

Animal ConservationWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2001

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off