Excitonic and Band‐to‐Band Transitions in Temperature‐Dependent Optical Absorption Spectra of Cu2SnS3 Thin Films

Excitonic and Band‐to‐Band Transitions in Temperature‐Dependent Optical Absorption Spectra... IntroductionCompound semiconductors such as Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 have recently been considered to be good candidates for the absorber layer in thin‐film solar cells. Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4‐based thin‐film solar cells have been demonstrated with respective power conversion efficiencies of 22.6 and 12.6%. However, these photovoltaic materials contain scarce (In, Ga) and toxic (Se) elements.Cu2SnS3 (CTS), which is composed of earth‐abundant and non‐toxic elements, has been reported to have a direct band gap and a high optical absorption coefficient, which makes it a promising material for solar cells. CTS‐based thin‐film solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of over 4% have been reported by several research groups, and Chantana et al. recently reported an improved efficiency of 4.8%.Although CTS‐based device fabrication and CTS thin film synthesis have been extensively reported, there has been insufficient investigation of the fundamental properties of CTS. An understanding of the optical and electronic properties of CTS is important to further improve the power conversion efficiency of CTS‐based thin‐film solar cells. In particular, the band gap energy is one of the most significant parameters for photovoltaic absorber materials because it determines the theoretical limit of the solar cell efficiency. The crystal structure of CTS used for solar cell http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physica Status Solidi (B) Basic Solid State Physics Wiley

Excitonic and Band‐to‐Band Transitions in Temperature‐Dependent Optical Absorption Spectra of Cu2SnS3 Thin Films

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
ISSN
0370-1972
eISSN
1521-3951
D.O.I.
10.1002/pssb.201700304
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionCompound semiconductors such as Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 have recently been considered to be good candidates for the absorber layer in thin‐film solar cells. Cu(In,Ga)Se2 and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4‐based thin‐film solar cells have been demonstrated with respective power conversion efficiencies of 22.6 and 12.6%. However, these photovoltaic materials contain scarce (In, Ga) and toxic (Se) elements.Cu2SnS3 (CTS), which is composed of earth‐abundant and non‐toxic elements, has been reported to have a direct band gap and a high optical absorption coefficient, which makes it a promising material for solar cells. CTS‐based thin‐film solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of over 4% have been reported by several research groups, and Chantana et al. recently reported an improved efficiency of 4.8%.Although CTS‐based device fabrication and CTS thin film synthesis have been extensively reported, there has been insufficient investigation of the fundamental properties of CTS. An understanding of the optical and electronic properties of CTS is important to further improve the power conversion efficiency of CTS‐based thin‐film solar cells. In particular, the band gap energy is one of the most significant parameters for photovoltaic absorber materials because it determines the theoretical limit of the solar cell efficiency. The crystal structure of CTS used for solar cell

Journal

Physica Status Solidi (B) Basic Solid State PhysicsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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