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Examination of the effects of traditional and modern martial arts training on aggressiveness

Examination of the effects of traditional and modern martial arts training on aggressiveness This study addresses two issues associated with the relationship between martial arts training and aggressiveness. The first is a replication of two recent findings, that for students trained traditionally, length of training varies inversely with aggressiveness, whereas for students trained in a “modern” style, length of training and aggressiveness are related directly. Second, we examine two competing explanations for the findings above. One is the training hypothesis, which holds that elements present in traditional approaches to martial arts but absent in modern approaches act to reduce aggression levels of students. These may include meditation, philosophy, emphasis on the kata (the forms of combat), etc. The alternate hypothesis, selection, holds instead that these findings are artifactual, a result of differential mortality in a setting characterized by high drop‐out rates. Two categories of students were interviewed: “movers,” students who had trained in more than one school, and “quitters,” students who had terminated their training, for any reason. These students were compared with “stayers” from an earlier study. Our results are consistent with the opposite effects of traditional and modern martial arts training on aggressiveness. Further, the data generally support the training hypothesis as against selection. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Aggressive Behavior Wiley

Examination of the effects of traditional and modern martial arts training on aggressiveness

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 Wiley‐Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0096-140X
eISSN
1098-2337
DOI
10.1002/1098-2337(1989)15:2<153::AID-AB2480150203>3.0.CO;2-V
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study addresses two issues associated with the relationship between martial arts training and aggressiveness. The first is a replication of two recent findings, that for students trained traditionally, length of training varies inversely with aggressiveness, whereas for students trained in a “modern” style, length of training and aggressiveness are related directly. Second, we examine two competing explanations for the findings above. One is the training hypothesis, which holds that elements present in traditional approaches to martial arts but absent in modern approaches act to reduce aggression levels of students. These may include meditation, philosophy, emphasis on the kata (the forms of combat), etc. The alternate hypothesis, selection, holds instead that these findings are artifactual, a result of differential mortality in a setting characterized by high drop‐out rates. Two categories of students were interviewed: “movers,” students who had trained in more than one school, and “quitters,” students who had terminated their training, for any reason. These students were compared with “stayers” from an earlier study. Our results are consistent with the opposite effects of traditional and modern martial arts training on aggressiveness. Further, the data generally support the training hypothesis as against selection.

Journal

Aggressive BehaviorWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1989

References