Evolving high commitment management and the experience of the RAC call centre

Evolving high commitment management and the experience of the RAC call centre tudies of High Commitment Management (HCM) or what the Americans term High Performing Work Systems (HPWS) have, in the main, been undertaken through large scale survey data of a whole sector, often the manufacturing sector, or across a number of sectors. The service sector may, however, prove a fertile ground for studies seeking to trace the effect of the adoption of particular sets of HR practices on the performance of the business. Service employees, especially those on the `front line’ , are likely to be critical to the performance of the business: their work is people oriented, rarely completely routinised, sensitive to changes in the internal and external environment and strategically important because they span the organisation/public interface (Frenkel et al, 1999). There is likely to be a direct connection between levels of employee performance, especially commitment, with standards of customer service which may lead to increased levels of customer satisfaction and retention and improved cost management (Peccei and Rosenthal, 1997; Schneider and Bowen, 1993; Schlesinger and Heskett, 1991). One dif® culty of undertaking research in the service sector has been a lack of performance data. It is hard to gain access to the sort of data typically http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Resource Management Journal Wiley

Evolving high commitment management and the experience of the RAC call centre

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0954-5395
eISSN
1748-8583
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-8583.2000.tb00014.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

tudies of High Commitment Management (HCM) or what the Americans term High Performing Work Systems (HPWS) have, in the main, been undertaken through large scale survey data of a whole sector, often the manufacturing sector, or across a number of sectors. The service sector may, however, prove a fertile ground for studies seeking to trace the effect of the adoption of particular sets of HR practices on the performance of the business. Service employees, especially those on the `front line’ , are likely to be critical to the performance of the business: their work is people oriented, rarely completely routinised, sensitive to changes in the internal and external environment and strategically important because they span the organisation/public interface (Frenkel et al, 1999). There is likely to be a direct connection between levels of employee performance, especially commitment, with standards of customer service which may lead to increased levels of customer satisfaction and retention and improved cost management (Peccei and Rosenthal, 1997; Schneider and Bowen, 1993; Schlesinger and Heskett, 1991). One dif® culty of undertaking research in the service sector has been a lack of performance data. It is hard to gain access to the sort of data typically

Journal

Human Resource Management JournalWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2000

References

  • The strategic HRM debate and the resource‐based view of the firm
    Boxall, Boxall
  • Teams between hierarchy and commitment: change and the internal environment
    Mueller, Mueller
  • The adoption of high involvement work practices
    Pil, Pil; MacDuffie, MacDuffie
  • Can we speak of high commitment management on the shop floor
    Wood, Wood

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