Evolution of the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease

Evolution of the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease Our knowledge of the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is limited. The most conspicuous changes seen in the brain are deposits of insoluble proteins in both extracellular and intraneuronal locations. The extracellular deposits consist primarily of a specific A4 amyloid protein. The significance of these deposits remains to be determined, as they are often found in the cerebral cortex of non‐demented elderly persons. More telling is the gradual accumulation of insoluble fibrous material within some neurons that consists mainly of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein. Six stages of increasingly severe cortical destruction can be distinguished. Stages I and II are characterized by neurofibrillary changes that are largely confined to the transentorhinal region, whereas stages III and IV are marked by severe involvement of both the entorhinal and transentorhinal regions. Isocortical destruction occurs during stages V and VI. This progression in cortical pathology correlates with the gradual worsening of clinical symptoms. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Acta Neurologica Scandinavica Wiley

Evolution of the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1996 Blackwell Munksgaard
ISSN
0001-6314
eISSN
1600-0404
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1600-0404.1996.tb05866.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Our knowledge of the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is limited. The most conspicuous changes seen in the brain are deposits of insoluble proteins in both extracellular and intraneuronal locations. The extracellular deposits consist primarily of a specific A4 amyloid protein. The significance of these deposits remains to be determined, as they are often found in the cerebral cortex of non‐demented elderly persons. More telling is the gradual accumulation of insoluble fibrous material within some neurons that consists mainly of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein. Six stages of increasingly severe cortical destruction can be distinguished. Stages I and II are characterized by neurofibrillary changes that are largely confined to the transentorhinal region, whereas stages III and IV are marked by severe involvement of both the entorhinal and transentorhinal regions. Isocortical destruction occurs during stages V and VI. This progression in cortical pathology correlates with the gradual worsening of clinical symptoms.

Journal

Acta Neurologica ScandinavicaWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1996

References

  • Perforant pathway changes and the memory impairment of Alzheimer's disease
    Hyman, Hyman; Hoesen, Hoesen; Kromer, Kromer; Damasio, Damasio
  • Demonstration of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary changes in whole brain sections
    Braak, Braak; Braak, Braak
  • Tau proteins and neurofibrillary degeneration
    Goedert, Goedert; Spillantini, Spillantini; Crowther, Crowther
  • Functional assessment staging (FAST)
    Reisberg, Reisberg
  • Neurofibrillary tangles in the cerebral cortex of sheep
    Nelson, Nelson; Greenberg, Greenberg; Saper, Saper
  • Staging of Alzheimer's disease‐related neurofibrillary changes
    Braak, Braak; Braak, Braak

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