Evidence of a possible link between obesogenic food advertising and child overweight

Evidence of a possible link between obesogenic food advertising and child overweight A recent review of the literature concluded that advertising of foods on television may influence children's food choices and encourage unhealthy diets, but the review acknowledged there was a lack of clear evidence in coming to this conclusion. The present paper examines ecological evidence for a link between advertising to children and the risk of overweight using data from surveys of advertising on children's television and estimates of the prevalence of overweight among children, in the USA, Australia and eight European countries. A significant association was found between the proportion of children overweight and the numbers of advertisements per hour on children's television, especially those advertisements that encourage the consumption of energy‐dense, micronutrient‐poor foods (r = 0.81, P < 0.005). A weaker, negative association was found between the proportion of children overweight and the number of advertisements encouraging healthier diets (r = −0.56, P < 0.10). The quantity of advertising on children's television appears to be related to the prevalence of excess body weight among children. Furthermore, the content of the advertising appears to have a specific effect. The findings justify the need for taking precautionary measures to reduce children's exposure to obesogenic marketing practices. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Obesity Reviews Wiley

Evidence of a possible link between obesogenic food advertising and child overweight

Obesity Reviews, Volume 6 (3) – Aug 1, 2005

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 2005 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
1467-7881
eISSN
1467-789X
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-789X.2005.00191.x
pmid
16045635
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A recent review of the literature concluded that advertising of foods on television may influence children's food choices and encourage unhealthy diets, but the review acknowledged there was a lack of clear evidence in coming to this conclusion. The present paper examines ecological evidence for a link between advertising to children and the risk of overweight using data from surveys of advertising on children's television and estimates of the prevalence of overweight among children, in the USA, Australia and eight European countries. A significant association was found between the proportion of children overweight and the numbers of advertisements per hour on children's television, especially those advertisements that encourage the consumption of energy‐dense, micronutrient‐poor foods (r = 0.81, P < 0.005). A weaker, negative association was found between the proportion of children overweight and the number of advertisements encouraging healthier diets (r = −0.56, P < 0.10). The quantity of advertising on children's television appears to be related to the prevalence of excess body weight among children. Furthermore, the content of the advertising appears to have a specific effect. The findings justify the need for taking precautionary measures to reduce children's exposure to obesogenic marketing practices.

Journal

Obesity ReviewsWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2005

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

  • Obesity in children and young people: a crisis in public health
    Lobstein, T; Baur, L; Uauy, R.

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