EVIDENCE FOR THE CLOSE ASSOCIATION OF A GLYCOPROTEIN WITH MYELIN IN RAT BRAIN

EVIDENCE FOR THE CLOSE ASSOCIATION OF A GLYCOPROTEIN WITH MYELIN IN RAT BRAIN Abstract— Myelin was purified from rats which had been injected intracerebrally with radioactive fucose in order to label specifically the glycoproteins. Myelin contained a small amount of fucose‐labelled glycoproteins in comparison to that in other subcellular fractions, but polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate revealed a unique pattern of radioactive glycoproteins dominated by a major peak. The same glycoprotein was not prominent in the other subcellular fractions which were examined. This major glycoprotein in the myelin fraction was also labelled after injection with (3H)glucosamine or N‐(3H)acetylmannosamine. It was the most intensely staining myelin protein when gels were treated with periodic acid‐Schiff reagents, an indication that, in terms of protein‐bound carbohydrate, it is the major glycoprotein in the myelin fraction. The glycoprotein was present in myelin purified from rats ranging in age from 14 days to 14 months. Extensive recycling of the myelin through the purification procedures did not significantly reduce the amount of glycoprotein in the myelin. Double label experiments with (3H)fucose and (14C)fucose were used to compare glycoproteins in myelin purified from white and grey matter, respectively, and from mixed homogenates of myelinated and unmyelinated brain. The results obtained from these experiments suggested that the glycoprotein is closely associated with myelin and that it is not in an unrelated contaminating structure. Possible locations of the glycoprotein are discussed. They include the myelin membrane itself, the oligodendroglial plasma membrane, and the axolemma of myelinated axons. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neurochemistry Wiley

EVIDENCE FOR THE CLOSE ASSOCIATION OF A GLYCOPROTEIN WITH MYELIN IN RAT BRAIN

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1973 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-3042
eISSN
1471-4159
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1471-4159.1973.tb07573.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract— Myelin was purified from rats which had been injected intracerebrally with radioactive fucose in order to label specifically the glycoproteins. Myelin contained a small amount of fucose‐labelled glycoproteins in comparison to that in other subcellular fractions, but polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate revealed a unique pattern of radioactive glycoproteins dominated by a major peak. The same glycoprotein was not prominent in the other subcellular fractions which were examined. This major glycoprotein in the myelin fraction was also labelled after injection with (3H)glucosamine or N‐(3H)acetylmannosamine. It was the most intensely staining myelin protein when gels were treated with periodic acid‐Schiff reagents, an indication that, in terms of protein‐bound carbohydrate, it is the major glycoprotein in the myelin fraction. The glycoprotein was present in myelin purified from rats ranging in age from 14 days to 14 months. Extensive recycling of the myelin through the purification procedures did not significantly reduce the amount of glycoprotein in the myelin. Double label experiments with (3H)fucose and (14C)fucose were used to compare glycoproteins in myelin purified from white and grey matter, respectively, and from mixed homogenates of myelinated and unmyelinated brain. The results obtained from these experiments suggested that the glycoprotein is closely associated with myelin and that it is not in an unrelated contaminating structure. Possible locations of the glycoprotein are discussed. They include the myelin membrane itself, the oligodendroglial plasma membrane, and the axolemma of myelinated axons.

Journal

Journal of NeurochemistryWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1973

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