Evidence‐based practice and the residential treatment of eating disorders: Time to raise the bar

Evidence‐based practice and the residential treatment of eating disorders: Time to raise the bar The past two decades have seen rapid growth in residential treatment centers for eating disorders. These behavioral health treatment centers arose in the 1990s as a response to the advent of managed care and resultant pressures to curtail inpatient lengths of stay and hospital treatment costs. In contrast to academically affiliated hospital programs where a majority of patients previously received specialty care, these residential programs are free‐standing facilities, often established as for‐profit entities, with lower daily treatment costs than hospital‐based programs. The number of residential beds expanded substantially in the wake of increased coverage for eating disorders treatment following passage of the 2008 Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equities Act (MHPAEA) and the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA). This increase was buoyed by a large influx of cash from private equity companies as investors identified behavioral health in general, and eating disorders treatment in particular, as an undervalued growth industry (Attia, Blackwood, Guarda, Marcus, & Rothman, ).Interest in outcome measurements as a quality standard for behavioral health treatments is growing (Attia, Marcus, Walsh, & Guarda, ). In the eating disorders field, treatment outcomes depend on weight restoration and the reversal of starvation in anorexia nervosa, the normalization of eating http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice Wiley

Evidence‐based practice and the residential treatment of eating disorders: Time to raise the bar

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Society of Clinical Psychology
ISSN
0969-5893
eISSN
1468-2850
D.O.I.
10.1111/cpsp.12232
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The past two decades have seen rapid growth in residential treatment centers for eating disorders. These behavioral health treatment centers arose in the 1990s as a response to the advent of managed care and resultant pressures to curtail inpatient lengths of stay and hospital treatment costs. In contrast to academically affiliated hospital programs where a majority of patients previously received specialty care, these residential programs are free‐standing facilities, often established as for‐profit entities, with lower daily treatment costs than hospital‐based programs. The number of residential beds expanded substantially in the wake of increased coverage for eating disorders treatment following passage of the 2008 Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equities Act (MHPAEA) and the 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA). This increase was buoyed by a large influx of cash from private equity companies as investors identified behavioral health in general, and eating disorders treatment in particular, as an undervalued growth industry (Attia, Blackwood, Guarda, Marcus, & Rothman, ).Interest in outcome measurements as a quality standard for behavioral health treatments is growing (Attia, Marcus, Walsh, & Guarda, ). In the eating disorders field, treatment outcomes depend on weight restoration and the reversal of starvation in anorexia nervosa, the normalization of eating

Journal

Clinical Psychology: Science and PracticeWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

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