Evidence‐based consensus on opportunistic infections in inflammatory bowel disease

Evidence‐based consensus on opportunistic infections in inflammatory bowel disease Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), mainly including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is a chronic non‐specific intestinal disease. The chronic, protracted course of IBD severely affects the patient's quality of life. The treatment of IBD has gone through three phases. Glucocorticoids were introduced in the 1950s, while immunosuppressive agents began to be used in the 1960s, and therapeutics is now in the era of biological agents. With the progression and continuous standardization of its treatment, treatment efficacy for IBD has made great progress, resulted in significantly decreased complications and mortality in the patients. However, monotherapy or combination therapy with these drugs will change patient's immune status, which may bring corresponding issues, particularly an increased risk of opportunistic infection.Opportunistic infection refers to micro‐organisms that have limited or no pathogenic capacity in healthy human bodies but cause diseases or induce infections when the immune system is compromised by other diseases such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or drug medications such as immunosuppressive agents. IBD patients are at a high risk for opportunistic infections. First, the disease itself can cause a reduced nutritional status in IBD patients. Second, the application of glucocorticoids, immunosuppressive and biological agents can severely inhibit patient's immunity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Digestive Diseases Wiley

Evidence‐based consensus on opportunistic infections in inflammatory bowel disease

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/evidence-based-consensus-on-opportunistic-infections-in-inflammatory-l1QzfWK4yo
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd
ISSN
1751-2972
eISSN
1751-2980
D.O.I.
10.1111/1751-2980.12578
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), mainly including Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is a chronic non‐specific intestinal disease. The chronic, protracted course of IBD severely affects the patient's quality of life. The treatment of IBD has gone through three phases. Glucocorticoids were introduced in the 1950s, while immunosuppressive agents began to be used in the 1960s, and therapeutics is now in the era of biological agents. With the progression and continuous standardization of its treatment, treatment efficacy for IBD has made great progress, resulted in significantly decreased complications and mortality in the patients. However, monotherapy or combination therapy with these drugs will change patient's immune status, which may bring corresponding issues, particularly an increased risk of opportunistic infection.Opportunistic infection refers to micro‐organisms that have limited or no pathogenic capacity in healthy human bodies but cause diseases or induce infections when the immune system is compromised by other diseases such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or drug medications such as immunosuppressive agents. IBD patients are at a high risk for opportunistic infections. First, the disease itself can cause a reduced nutritional status in IBD patients. Second, the application of glucocorticoids, immunosuppressive and biological agents can severely inhibit patient's immunity.

Journal

Journal of Digestive DiseasesWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off