Evapotranspiration from Douglas fir stands exposed to soil water deficits

Evapotranspiration from Douglas fir stands exposed to soil water deficits The rate of evapotranspiration from thinned and unthinned stands of Douglas fir was measured using energy and water balance methods. At high values of soil water storage in the root zone the evapotranspiration rate was approximately 80% of the equilibrium evaporation rate. Below a critical value of soil water storage the ratio of the evapotranspiration rate to the equilibrium evaporation rate (E/Eeq) tended to decrease linearly with decreasing soil water storage. The critical values of soil water storage in the root zone were 11.8 and 8.3 cm for the thinned and unthinned stand, respectively. Below these critical storage values, there was approximately 3.5 cm of water remaining in both root zones that was extractable by the trees. The relationship between E/Eeq and the fraction of extractable water in the root zone for both stands was very similar for sunny days. In this relationship, E/Eeq began to decrease when there was approximately 40% of the extractable water remaining in the root zones of both stands. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Evapotranspiration from Douglas fir stands exposed to soil water deficits

Water Resources Research, Volume 15 (1) – Feb 1, 1979

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/evapotranspiration-from-douglas-fir-stands-exposed-to-soil-water-G0K0ByBu0B
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
D.O.I.
10.1029/WR015i001p00164
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The rate of evapotranspiration from thinned and unthinned stands of Douglas fir was measured using energy and water balance methods. At high values of soil water storage in the root zone the evapotranspiration rate was approximately 80% of the equilibrium evaporation rate. Below a critical value of soil water storage the ratio of the evapotranspiration rate to the equilibrium evaporation rate (E/Eeq) tended to decrease linearly with decreasing soil water storage. The critical values of soil water storage in the root zone were 11.8 and 8.3 cm for the thinned and unthinned stand, respectively. Below these critical storage values, there was approximately 3.5 cm of water remaining in both root zones that was extractable by the trees. The relationship between E/Eeq and the fraction of extractable water in the root zone for both stands was very similar for sunny days. In this relationship, E/Eeq began to decrease when there was approximately 40% of the extractable water remaining in the root zones of both stands.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1979

References

  • A study of evapotranspiration from a Douglas fir forest using the energy balance approach
    McNaughton, McNaughton; Black, Black

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off