Evaporation from the wet canopy of a pine forest

Evaporation from the wet canopy of a pine forest Measurements of the energy budget of a pine forest were made on 70 days when the canopy was wet. Out of 245 20‐min periods when the canopy was wholly wet, 173 were occasions when the latent heat flux exceeded the net radiation, the additional energy being provided by a downward flux of sensible heat. Under the same level of radiation the average rate of evaporation of intercepted precipitation has been found to be three times the average rate of transpiration, so that the loss by evaporation of intercepted precipitation is only partly compensated by the suppression of transpiration. It is concluded that reliable estimates of the water resources of forested areas require a separate calculation of the interception and transpiration components of the total evaporation loss. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Evaporation from the wet canopy of a pine forest

Water Resources Research, Volume 13 (6) – Dec 1, 1977

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
DOI
10.1029/WR013i006p00915
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Measurements of the energy budget of a pine forest were made on 70 days when the canopy was wet. Out of 245 20‐min periods when the canopy was wholly wet, 173 were occasions when the latent heat flux exceeded the net radiation, the additional energy being provided by a downward flux of sensible heat. Under the same level of radiation the average rate of evaporation of intercepted precipitation has been found to be three times the average rate of transpiration, so that the loss by evaporation of intercepted precipitation is only partly compensated by the suppression of transpiration. It is concluded that reliable estimates of the water resources of forested areas require a separate calculation of the interception and transpiration components of the total evaporation loss.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1977

References

  • A study of evapotranspiration from a Douglas fir forest using the energy balance approach
    McNaughton, McNaughton; Black, Black
  • The evaporation of intercepted rainfall from a forest stand: An analysis by simulation
    Murphy, Murphy; Knoerr, Knoerr

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