Evaluation of Surface Roughness of Ceramic and Resin Composite Material Used for Conservative Indirect Restorations, after Repolishing by Intraoral Means

Evaluation of Surface Roughness of Ceramic and Resin Composite Material Used for Conservative... Until recently, restoring teeth with large defects in the posterior area involved no alternative treatment but the use of a crown, most often in combination with a post‐and‐core and forced endodontic treatment. Contemporary dental practice, however, taking advantage of developments in resin cements and adhesive technology, also includes minimally invasive restorations, such as indirect resin composite restorations and ceramic inlays, onlays, and overlays. Such restorations require little or no sacrifice of healthy tooth structure, no forced endodontic treatment, and additionally, they have the ability to imitate the behavior of healthy enamel and dentin.Since inlays, onlays, and overlays have little or no mechanical retention on the abutment tooth, occlusal adjustments are better performed after the cementation of the restoration. Especially in cases when ceramic material is preferred, the restorations are very fragile before cementation, and therefore they should not be subject to occlusal forces before bonding. However, with the completion of this procedure, the restoration acquires a rough surface and has to be repolished intraorally.Surface roughness, both in ceramic and resin composite material, is associated with faster formation and maturation of the biofilm, resulting in a more complex bacterial population. Rough surfaces are more susceptible to staining over time, whereas http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Prosthodontics Wiley

Evaluation of Surface Roughness of Ceramic and Resin Composite Material Used for Conservative Indirect Restorations, after Repolishing by Intraoral Means

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/evaluation-of-surface-roughness-of-ceramic-and-resin-composite-iicMSdPg4K
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2017 American College of Prosthodontists
ISSN
1059-941X
eISSN
1532-849X
D.O.I.
10.1111/jopr.12390
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Until recently, restoring teeth with large defects in the posterior area involved no alternative treatment but the use of a crown, most often in combination with a post‐and‐core and forced endodontic treatment. Contemporary dental practice, however, taking advantage of developments in resin cements and adhesive technology, also includes minimally invasive restorations, such as indirect resin composite restorations and ceramic inlays, onlays, and overlays. Such restorations require little or no sacrifice of healthy tooth structure, no forced endodontic treatment, and additionally, they have the ability to imitate the behavior of healthy enamel and dentin.Since inlays, onlays, and overlays have little or no mechanical retention on the abutment tooth, occlusal adjustments are better performed after the cementation of the restoration. Especially in cases when ceramic material is preferred, the restorations are very fragile before cementation, and therefore they should not be subject to occlusal forces before bonding. However, with the completion of this procedure, the restoration acquires a rough surface and has to be repolished intraorally.Surface roughness, both in ceramic and resin composite material, is associated with faster formation and maturation of the biofilm, resulting in a more complex bacterial population. Rough surfaces are more susceptible to staining over time, whereas

Journal

Journal of ProsthodonticsWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2017

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off