Evaluation of air samplers and filter materials for collection and recovery of airborne norovirus

Evaluation of air samplers and filter materials for collection and recovery of airborne norovirus IntroductionHuman norovirus (NoV) is the main aetiological agent responsible for gastrointestinal illness in all age groups (Patel et al. ). Transmission of NoV occurs via the faecal‐oral route either directly by person‐to‐person contact or indirectly through contaminated food, water or fomites (Marks et al. ; Koopmans and Duizer ; D'Souza et al. ). In addition, dissemination of NoV through aerosol droplets, especially following vomiting, has been inferred to occur based on epidemiological information from NoV outbreaks (Marks et al. , ). Such airborne transmission of NoV is believed to occur via inhalation and subsequent ingestion (Marks et al. ). However, at this point, the importance of airborne transmission is not well defined and only few studies relating to detection of airborne NoV exist (Brooks et al. ; Uhrbrand et al. , ; Masclaux et al. ; Bonifait et al. ).To contribute with a new understanding of the extent of airborne transmission of NoV and other enteric viruses such as human adenovirus (AdV), it is essential to have sensitive and robust methods for sampling of viruses from air. Collection of aerosolized viruses is normally conducted by creating a vacuum through a sampling apparatus. This will result in air entering the devices where aerosolized viruses will be retained by physical http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Microbiology Wiley

Evaluation of air samplers and filter materials for collection and recovery of airborne norovirus

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 The Society for Applied Microbiology
ISSN
1364-5072
eISSN
1365-2672
D.O.I.
10.1111/jam.13588
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionHuman norovirus (NoV) is the main aetiological agent responsible for gastrointestinal illness in all age groups (Patel et al. ). Transmission of NoV occurs via the faecal‐oral route either directly by person‐to‐person contact or indirectly through contaminated food, water or fomites (Marks et al. ; Koopmans and Duizer ; D'Souza et al. ). In addition, dissemination of NoV through aerosol droplets, especially following vomiting, has been inferred to occur based on epidemiological information from NoV outbreaks (Marks et al. , ). Such airborne transmission of NoV is believed to occur via inhalation and subsequent ingestion (Marks et al. ). However, at this point, the importance of airborne transmission is not well defined and only few studies relating to detection of airborne NoV exist (Brooks et al. ; Uhrbrand et al. , ; Masclaux et al. ; Bonifait et al. ).To contribute with a new understanding of the extent of airborne transmission of NoV and other enteric viruses such as human adenovirus (AdV), it is essential to have sensitive and robust methods for sampling of viruses from air. Collection of aerosolized viruses is normally conducted by creating a vacuum through a sampling apparatus. This will result in air entering the devices where aerosolized viruses will be retained by physical

Journal

Journal of Applied MicrobiologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

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