Evaluating the Distribution of Cellulases and the Recycling of Free Cellulases during the Hydrolysis of Lignocellulosic Substrates

Evaluating the Distribution of Cellulases and the Recycling of Free Cellulases during the... The recycling of cellulase enzymes is one potential strategy for reducing the cost of the enzymatic hydrolysis step during the bioconversion of lignocellulosics to ethanol. To determine the influence of lignin on the post‐hydrolysis distribution of cellulase enzymes between the liquid and solid phases, the hydrolysis of Avicel was compared to an organosolv‐pretreated Douglas fir substrate with a lignin content of 3.0%. After a 12 h hydrolysis reaction on Avicel, 90% of the added cellulases (including β‐glucosidases) remained “free” in the liquid phase compared to only 65% in the case of the hydrolysis of the organosolv‐pretreated Douglas fir substrate. The readsorption of free cellulases by supplementing the hydrolysis reaction with fresh substrate was explored as a potential means of recovering the free cellulases that remain in the liquid phase after hydrolysis. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm was used to develop a model predicting that 82% of the free cellulases could be recovered via readsorption onto fresh substrates during the hydrolysis of an ethanol‐pretreated mixed softwood substrate with a lignin content of 6%. Recoverable free cellulase values of 85% and 88% based on cellulase activity and protein content, respectively, were obtained after experimental verification of the model. The readsorption of free cellulases onto fresh lignocellulosic substrates was shown to be an effective method for free enzyme recovery. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biotechnology Progress Wiley

Evaluating the Distribution of Cellulases and the Recycling of Free Cellulases during the Hydrolysis of Lignocellulosic Substrates

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE)
ISSN
8756-7938
eISSN
1520-6033
DOI
10.1002/btpr.60354
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The recycling of cellulase enzymes is one potential strategy for reducing the cost of the enzymatic hydrolysis step during the bioconversion of lignocellulosics to ethanol. To determine the influence of lignin on the post‐hydrolysis distribution of cellulase enzymes between the liquid and solid phases, the hydrolysis of Avicel was compared to an organosolv‐pretreated Douglas fir substrate with a lignin content of 3.0%. After a 12 h hydrolysis reaction on Avicel, 90% of the added cellulases (including β‐glucosidases) remained “free” in the liquid phase compared to only 65% in the case of the hydrolysis of the organosolv‐pretreated Douglas fir substrate. The readsorption of free cellulases by supplementing the hydrolysis reaction with fresh substrate was explored as a potential means of recovering the free cellulases that remain in the liquid phase after hydrolysis. The Langmuir adsorption isotherm was used to develop a model predicting that 82% of the free cellulases could be recovered via readsorption onto fresh substrates during the hydrolysis of an ethanol‐pretreated mixed softwood substrate with a lignin content of 6%. Recoverable free cellulase values of 85% and 88% based on cellulase activity and protein content, respectively, were obtained after experimental verification of the model. The readsorption of free cellulases onto fresh lignocellulosic substrates was shown to be an effective method for free enzyme recovery.

Journal

Biotechnology ProgressWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2007

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