European post‐glacial forests: compositional changes in response to climatic change

European post‐glacial forests: compositional changes in response to climatic change Abstract. Multivariate analysis of an extensive palyno‐logical database for Europe has enabled reconstruction of broad‐scale vegetation history. Whereas many major features of present vegetation patterns were established early in the Holocene, floristic composition of the forests has changed continuously up to the present day. For example, although ‘mixed deciduous forests’ had reached approximately their present extent in northwest Europe by 8000 B.P., Tilia peaked in abundance in these forests during the middle post glacial, whereas Pinus was most abundant in these forests during the early post‐glacial and Fagus increased in abundance only in recent millennia. Pollen‐climate response surfaces for major pollen taxa show how their distribution and abundance patterns relate to contemporary climate. Past forest‐compositional changes were responses to climatic changes, the nature of which can be inferred from pollen‐climate response surfaces. Post‐glacial climate changes have been different in magnitude and direction in different regions of Europe. For example, in recent millennia the vegetation changes indicate decreasing summer temperatures in northern Europe but increasing summer temperatures in the Mediterranean region. The way in which vegetation responded to past climatic changes gives insight into the likely response of vegetation to future climate changes induced by the ‘greenhouse effect’. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

European post‐glacial forests: compositional changes in response to climatic change

Journal of Vegetation Science, Volume 1 (4) – Aug 1, 1990

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/european-post-glacial-forests-compositional-changes-in-response-to-HDCx27qwLw
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1990 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
D.O.I.
10.2307/3235785
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Multivariate analysis of an extensive palyno‐logical database for Europe has enabled reconstruction of broad‐scale vegetation history. Whereas many major features of present vegetation patterns were established early in the Holocene, floristic composition of the forests has changed continuously up to the present day. For example, although ‘mixed deciduous forests’ had reached approximately their present extent in northwest Europe by 8000 B.P., Tilia peaked in abundance in these forests during the middle post glacial, whereas Pinus was most abundant in these forests during the early post‐glacial and Fagus increased in abundance only in recent millennia. Pollen‐climate response surfaces for major pollen taxa show how their distribution and abundance patterns relate to contemporary climate. Past forest‐compositional changes were responses to climatic changes, the nature of which can be inferred from pollen‐climate response surfaces. Post‐glacial climate changes have been different in magnitude and direction in different regions of Europe. For example, in recent millennia the vegetation changes indicate decreasing summer temperatures in northern Europe but increasing summer temperatures in the Mediterranean region. The way in which vegetation responded to past climatic changes gives insight into the likely response of vegetation to future climate changes induced by the ‘greenhouse effect’.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1990

References

  • Pleistocene occurrences of the European pond tortoise (Emys orbicularis L.) in Britain
    Stuart, Stuart

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off