Estrogenic activity in five United Kingdom rivers detected by measurement of vitellogenesis in caged male trout

Estrogenic activity in five United Kingdom rivers detected by measurement of vitellogenesis in... It was recently demonstrated that most, if not all, effluents of sewage‐treatment works (STWs) in the United Kingdom are estrogenic to fish. As many STWs discharge into rivers, it is possible that some stretches of rivers downstream of where the effluent enters might also be estrogenic. To assess this possibility, the induction of vitellogenin synthesis in caged male trout placed at various distances downstream of the effluent entry point was used as a biomarker of estrogen exposure. Individual discharges into five rivers in England were studied. In four cases, fish placed in the neat effluent, or close to where it entered a river, showed very marked and rapid increases in their plasma vitellogenin concentrations, demonstrating that the effluent was estrogenic. In two of these four cases, none of the downstream sites were estrogenic, whereas in one of the four, fish placed at a site 1.5 km downstream did respond by synthesizing appreciable amounts of vitellogenin, although sites further downstream were not estrogenic. The situation in the fourth river was quite different; not only was the effluent extremely estrogenic (a maximum vitellogenin response in the mg/ml range was attained), but so were all the other study sites on the river, the last of which was 5 km downstream of where the effluent entered. This particular river receives trade effluent from wool‐scouring mills, which contains much higher concentrations of alkylphenolic chemicals than any of the other discharges studied. It is suggested that these chemicals probably account for the estrogenic activity of this river. The final (fifth) river showed no estrogenic activity, not even in the neat effluent. This discharge comes from a very small STW, which receives no trade waste, and one or both of these factors may account for why the effluent (and hence the river) was not estrogenic. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry Wiley

Estrogenic activity in five United Kingdom rivers detected by measurement of vitellogenesis in caged male trout

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 SETAC
ISSN
0730-7268
eISSN
1552-8618
DOI
10.1002/etc.5620160320
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It was recently demonstrated that most, if not all, effluents of sewage‐treatment works (STWs) in the United Kingdom are estrogenic to fish. As many STWs discharge into rivers, it is possible that some stretches of rivers downstream of where the effluent enters might also be estrogenic. To assess this possibility, the induction of vitellogenin synthesis in caged male trout placed at various distances downstream of the effluent entry point was used as a biomarker of estrogen exposure. Individual discharges into five rivers in England were studied. In four cases, fish placed in the neat effluent, or close to where it entered a river, showed very marked and rapid increases in their plasma vitellogenin concentrations, demonstrating that the effluent was estrogenic. In two of these four cases, none of the downstream sites were estrogenic, whereas in one of the four, fish placed at a site 1.5 km downstream did respond by synthesizing appreciable amounts of vitellogenin, although sites further downstream were not estrogenic. The situation in the fourth river was quite different; not only was the effluent extremely estrogenic (a maximum vitellogenin response in the mg/ml range was attained), but so were all the other study sites on the river, the last of which was 5 km downstream of where the effluent entered. This particular river receives trade effluent from wool‐scouring mills, which contains much higher concentrations of alkylphenolic chemicals than any of the other discharges studied. It is suggested that these chemicals probably account for the estrogenic activity of this river. The final (fifth) river showed no estrogenic activity, not even in the neat effluent. This discharge comes from a very small STW, which receives no trade waste, and one or both of these factors may account for why the effluent (and hence the river) was not estrogenic.

Journal

Environmental Toxicology & ChemistryWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1997

References

  • Estrogenic activity of surfactants and some of their degradation products assessed using a recombinant yeast screen
    Routledge, Routledge; Sumpter, Sumpter
  • Concentrations of alkylphenols in rivers and estuaries in England and Wales
    Blackburn, Blackburn; Waldock, Waldock
  • Inhibition of testicular growth in rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) exposed to estrogenic alkylphenolic chemicals
    Jobling, Jobling; Sheahan, Sheahan; Osborne, Osborne; Matthiessen, Matthiessen; Sumpter, Sumpter
  • Agricultural chemicals in raw wool and the wool textile industry
    Shaw, Shaw

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