Estimation of flood frequency: An evaluation of two derived distribution procedures

Estimation of flood frequency: An evaluation of two derived distribution procedures The derived distribution approach for predicting flood frequency distributions provides a potentially attractive way to analyze flood hazards in ungaged watersheds. This paper examines the performance of two typical derived distribution techniques (Hebson and Wood, 1982; Diaz‐Granados et al., 1984). Flood frequency distributions obtained with each technique are compared to sample distributions estimated from measured discharge records. The comparison is based on over 40 years of discharge data from each of three different watersheds. Input parameters required by the derived distribution methods are estimated from limited data sets to simulate conditions encountered in watersheds where rainfall and discharge records are available for only a few years. Both of the derived flood frequency methods performed poorly in every watershed when compared to sample distributions. The results of the comparison suggest that fundamental improvements are needed before the derived distribution approach can be applied with any confidence. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Estimation of flood frequency: An evaluation of two derived distribution procedures

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
DOI
10.1029/WR023i007p01309
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The derived distribution approach for predicting flood frequency distributions provides a potentially attractive way to analyze flood hazards in ungaged watersheds. This paper examines the performance of two typical derived distribution techniques (Hebson and Wood, 1982; Diaz‐Granados et al., 1984). Flood frequency distributions obtained with each technique are compared to sample distributions estimated from measured discharge records. The comparison is based on over 40 years of discharge data from each of three different watersheds. Input parameters required by the derived distribution methods are estimated from limited data sets to simulate conditions encountered in watersheds where rainfall and discharge records are available for only a few years. Both of the derived flood frequency methods performed poorly in every watershed when compared to sample distributions. The results of the comparison suggest that fundamental improvements are needed before the derived distribution approach can be applied with any confidence.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1987

References

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