Estimating the Viability of Ovenbird and Kentucky Warbler Populations in Forest Fragments

Estimating the Viability of Ovenbird and Kentucky Warbler Populations in Forest Fragments Division of Biological Sciences 105 Tucker Hall University of Missouri - Columbia Columbia, MO 6521 1, U.S.A. JOHN FAABORG Division of Biological Sciences 105 Tucker Hall University of Missouri - Columbia Columbia, MO 6521 1, U.S.A. Introduction Breeding habitats for birds in deciduous forests of the eastern and central United States are becoming increasingly fragmented by human activities. Avian communities in small, isolated forest tracts are generally subsets of the communities present in larger forests (Blake & Katr 1987; Hayden et al. 1985); species that are intolerant of habitat area reduction are frequently termed “area-sensitive.” Severe declines in songbird populations, particularly those of forest-interior-breedingneotropical migrants, have been linked to the destruction and fragmentation of natural habitats (Lynch & Whigham 1978; Robbins 1979;Whitcomb et al. 1981). Detailed studies of the dynamics and constitution of small populations in relict habitats are needed (Lande 1988). Data on the presence of species over a range of patch sizes of suitable habitat have been analyzed to estimate the minimum patch size at which an area-sensitive species commonly occurs (Blake 1983; Diamond 1978; Galli et al. 1976),which is known as its “minimum area” requirement (Robbins 1979). However, tract sizes corresponding with incidence-curve inflection points http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Estimating the Viability of Ovenbird and Kentucky Warbler Populations in Forest Fragments

Conservation Biology, Volume 4 (2) – Jun 1, 1990

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 1990 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1111/j.1523-1739.1990.tb00108.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Division of Biological Sciences 105 Tucker Hall University of Missouri - Columbia Columbia, MO 6521 1, U.S.A. JOHN FAABORG Division of Biological Sciences 105 Tucker Hall University of Missouri - Columbia Columbia, MO 6521 1, U.S.A. Introduction Breeding habitats for birds in deciduous forests of the eastern and central United States are becoming increasingly fragmented by human activities. Avian communities in small, isolated forest tracts are generally subsets of the communities present in larger forests (Blake & Katr 1987; Hayden et al. 1985); species that are intolerant of habitat area reduction are frequently termed “area-sensitive.” Severe declines in songbird populations, particularly those of forest-interior-breedingneotropical migrants, have been linked to the destruction and fragmentation of natural habitats (Lynch & Whigham 1978; Robbins 1979;Whitcomb et al. 1981). Detailed studies of the dynamics and constitution of small populations in relict habitats are needed (Lande 1988). Data on the presence of species over a range of patch sizes of suitable habitat have been analyzed to estimate the minimum patch size at which an area-sensitive species commonly occurs (Blake 1983; Diamond 1978; Galli et al. 1976),which is known as its “minimum area” requirement (Robbins 1979). However, tract sizes corresponding with incidence-curve inflection points

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1990

References

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