Esterase D: a new human polymorphism

Esterase D: a new human polymorphism BY D. A. HOPKINSON, M. A. MESTRINER," J. CORTNER,? AND HARRY HARRIS M.R.C. Human Biochemical Genetics Unit, Oalton Laboratory, University College London Tashian (1961, 1969) demonstrated several different esterases in human red cells by electrophoresis. Azo dye coupling techniques were used to locate the esterase isozymes. Three main groups of esterases were defined on the basis of their electrophoretic properties, substrate specificities and inhibition characteristics, and were referred to as the A, B and C esterases. Isozymes of carbonic anhydrase, which also has esteratic activity, were also demonstrated using essentially similar techniques. Fig. 1, which is based on Tashian's work, shows a diagrammatic representation of the various red cell esterase isozymes after electrophoresis of haemolysates in borate starch gels at pH 8.0-8-6. The A esterases are subdivided into three sets of isozymes, A,, A, and As, which differ electrophoretically and in their storage properties and inhibition characteristics ; also the As isozymes have a larger molecular size than A, or A,. Inherited variants of these isozymes are rare in man but two different variant phenotypes have been reported (Tashian & Shaw, 1962; Tashian, 1965). They are of particular interest because each of the three subgroups of A esterase http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annals of Human Genetics Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1973 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0003-4800
eISSN
1469-1809
DOI
10.1111/j.1469-1809.1973.tb01820.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BY D. A. HOPKINSON, M. A. MESTRINER," J. CORTNER,? AND HARRY HARRIS M.R.C. Human Biochemical Genetics Unit, Oalton Laboratory, University College London Tashian (1961, 1969) demonstrated several different esterases in human red cells by electrophoresis. Azo dye coupling techniques were used to locate the esterase isozymes. Three main groups of esterases were defined on the basis of their electrophoretic properties, substrate specificities and inhibition characteristics, and were referred to as the A, B and C esterases. Isozymes of carbonic anhydrase, which also has esteratic activity, were also demonstrated using essentially similar techniques. Fig. 1, which is based on Tashian's work, shows a diagrammatic representation of the various red cell esterase isozymes after electrophoresis of haemolysates in borate starch gels at pH 8.0-8-6. The A esterases are subdivided into three sets of isozymes, A,, A, and As, which differ electrophoretically and in their storage properties and inhibition characteristics ; also the As isozymes have a larger molecular size than A, or A,. Inherited variants of these isozymes are rare in man but two different variant phenotypes have been reported (Tashian & Shaw, 1962; Tashian, 1965). They are of particular interest because each of the three subgroups of A esterase

Journal

Annals of Human GeneticsWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1973

References

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