Equity in Health Care Utilization: Further Tests Based on Hurdle Models and Swedish Micro Data

Equity in Health Care Utilization: Further Tests Based on Hurdle Models and Swedish Micro Data This paper tests the null hypothesis of no horizontal inequity in delivery of health care by use of count data hurdle models and Swedish micro data. It differs from most earlier work in three principal ways: First, the tests are carried out separately for physician and hospital care; second, the tests are carried out separately for the probability of seeking care and the amount of care received (given any use); and third, the tests are based on a model that includes several socioeconomic variables, e.g. income, education and size of community of residence. The paper rejects the hypothesis of no inequity because socioeconomic factors also have significant effects on utilization, e.g. income and size of community of residence. Size of community of residence has a positive significant effect on the frequency of physician visits but not on the probability of visiting a physician. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Health Economics Wiley

Equity in Health Care Utilization: Further Tests Based on Hurdle Models and Swedish Micro Data

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1057-9230
eISSN
1099-1050
D.O.I.
10.1002/(SICI)1099-1050(199705)6:3<303::AID-HEC270>3.0.CO;2-P
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper tests the null hypothesis of no horizontal inequity in delivery of health care by use of count data hurdle models and Swedish micro data. It differs from most earlier work in three principal ways: First, the tests are carried out separately for physician and hospital care; second, the tests are carried out separately for the probability of seeking care and the amount of care received (given any use); and third, the tests are based on a model that includes several socioeconomic variables, e.g. income, education and size of community of residence. The paper rejects the hypothesis of no inequity because socioeconomic factors also have significant effects on utilization, e.g. income and size of community of residence. Size of community of residence has a positive significant effect on the frequency of physician visits but not on the probability of visiting a physician. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Health EconomicsWiley

Published: May 1, 1997

References

  • Equity in the delivery of health care: some international comparisons
    van Doorslaer, van Doorslaer; Wagstaff, Wagstaff
  • The demand for health: an empirical reformulation of the Grossman model
    Wagstaff, Wagstaff
  • Econometric models based on count data: comparisons and applications of some estimators and tests
    Cameron, Cameron; Trivedi, Trivedi

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