Epithelial corneal oedema treated with honey

Epithelial corneal oedema treated with honey Honey was used in the Bible and Talmud ‘as a remedy’ (Shabbath 77b‐78a) and to treat bulimia ‘so the eyes sparkle again’ (Baba Kamma 85a). The acidic hyperosmotic milieu and the presence of the enzyme inhibin confer unique antimicrobial properties to honey. Honey was mentioned in the Talmud as having a propitious effect on the eyes: ‘Honey enlightens the eyes of man’ (Yoma 83b). This prompted a prospective study of topical honey as a hyperosmotic agent in the therapy of epithelial corneal oedema. Prospectively, 16 consecutive patients with epithelial corneal oedema who were not surgical candidates and who attended a private clinic from January 2000 to June 2000 formed the study population. Honey was applied to the cornea after informed consent. The 16 patients were not candidates for any surgical intervention (systemic contraindication, uniocular, multiple ocular conditions, poor candidate for penetrating keratoplasty, unreliable for follow‐up or drug therapy, refusal for surgery). A drop of honey was applied using a sterile cotton applicator. The documentation of corneal clearing was performed over several visits (mean two visits). Patients were given the option of using topical honey outside the clinic, if tolerated, 4−5 times daily. All corneas had an immediate complete http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical & Experimental Ophthalmology Wiley

Epithelial corneal oedema treated with honey

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/epithelial-corneal-oedema-treated-with-honey-S1hDGATglG
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1442-6404
eISSN
1442-9071
DOI
10.1046/j.1442-6404.2002.00482.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Honey was used in the Bible and Talmud ‘as a remedy’ (Shabbath 77b‐78a) and to treat bulimia ‘so the eyes sparkle again’ (Baba Kamma 85a). The acidic hyperosmotic milieu and the presence of the enzyme inhibin confer unique antimicrobial properties to honey. Honey was mentioned in the Talmud as having a propitious effect on the eyes: ‘Honey enlightens the eyes of man’ (Yoma 83b). This prompted a prospective study of topical honey as a hyperosmotic agent in the therapy of epithelial corneal oedema. Prospectively, 16 consecutive patients with epithelial corneal oedema who were not surgical candidates and who attended a private clinic from January 2000 to June 2000 formed the study population. Honey was applied to the cornea after informed consent. The 16 patients were not candidates for any surgical intervention (systemic contraindication, uniocular, multiple ocular conditions, poor candidate for penetrating keratoplasty, unreliable for follow‐up or drug therapy, refusal for surgery). A drop of honey was applied using a sterile cotton applicator. The documentation of corneal clearing was performed over several visits (mean two visits). Patients were given the option of using topical honey outside the clinic, if tolerated, 4−5 times daily. All corneas had an immediate complete

Journal

Clinical & Experimental OphthalmologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2002

References

  • The antibacterial action of honey. An in vitro study
    Jeddar, A; Kharsany, A; Ramsaroop, UG; Bhamjee, A; Haffejee, IE; Moosa, A
  • Honey: a remedy rediscovered
    Zumla, A; Lulat, A

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off