Enzymes as silage additives. 1. Silage quality, digestion, digestibility and performance in growing cattle

Enzymes as silage additives. 1. Silage quality, digestion, digestibility and performance in... Four grass silages were made from perennial ryegrass ensiled after a 1h wilt in 2‐t silos without additive application, with application of formic acid or with one of two enzyme mixtures of hemicellulases and cellulases (enzyme 1 and enzyme 2). Effluent losses were monitored over the ensiling period (130 d). Analyses of the silage showed that formic acid‐treated silage had lower concentrations of lactic acid than the other silages. Both enzyme‐treated silages had lower levels of cellulose, acid detergent fibre (ADF) and neutral‐detergent fibre (NDF) than the untreated and formic acid treated silages. Effluent production was highest with enzyme‐treated silages. The silages were subsequently fed to growing steers equipped with rumen cannulae and T‐piece duodenal cannulae. Apparent whole‐tract digestibilities of organic matter constituents were significantly lower (P < 0·05) with both enzyme‐treated silages (untreated; 0·736, formic acid; 0·722, enzyme 1; 0·694, enzyme 2; 0·703). Both untreated and enzyme 2‐treated silages sustained higher nitrogen digestibilities (g g−1 intake) (untreated; 0·675, formic acid; 0·636, enzyme 1; 0·630, enzyme 2; 0·662) and N retentions (g d−1) untreated; 16·0, formic acid; 14·0, enzyme 1; 11·6, enzyme 2; 16·6), but none of these differences was significant. When formic acid‐treated silage was offered, there was a greater amount of organic matter apparently digested in the rumen (ADOMR). Non‐ammonia nitrogen and microbial nitrogen flows at the duodenum were similar on all diets. The efficiency of microbial protein synthesis was highest with enzyme 2‐treated silage and lowest with formic acid‐treated silage (untreated, 35·4; formic acid, 25·2; enzyme 1, 30·4; enzyme 2, 39·4), but none of these differences were significant. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Grass & Forage Science Wiley

Enzymes as silage additives. 1. Silage quality, digestion, digestibility and performance in growing cattle

Grass & Forage Science, Volume 46 (1) – Mar 1, 1991

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0142-5242
eISSN
1365-2494
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-2494.1991.tb02208.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Four grass silages were made from perennial ryegrass ensiled after a 1h wilt in 2‐t silos without additive application, with application of formic acid or with one of two enzyme mixtures of hemicellulases and cellulases (enzyme 1 and enzyme 2). Effluent losses were monitored over the ensiling period (130 d). Analyses of the silage showed that formic acid‐treated silage had lower concentrations of lactic acid than the other silages. Both enzyme‐treated silages had lower levels of cellulose, acid detergent fibre (ADF) and neutral‐detergent fibre (NDF) than the untreated and formic acid treated silages. Effluent production was highest with enzyme‐treated silages. The silages were subsequently fed to growing steers equipped with rumen cannulae and T‐piece duodenal cannulae. Apparent whole‐tract digestibilities of organic matter constituents were significantly lower (P < 0·05) with both enzyme‐treated silages (untreated; 0·736, formic acid; 0·722, enzyme 1; 0·694, enzyme 2; 0·703). Both untreated and enzyme 2‐treated silages sustained higher nitrogen digestibilities (g g−1 intake) (untreated; 0·675, formic acid; 0·636, enzyme 1; 0·630, enzyme 2; 0·662) and N retentions (g d−1) untreated; 16·0, formic acid; 14·0, enzyme 1; 11·6, enzyme 2; 16·6), but none of these differences was significant. When formic acid‐treated silage was offered, there was a greater amount of organic matter apparently digested in the rumen (ADOMR). Non‐ammonia nitrogen and microbial nitrogen flows at the duodenum were similar on all diets. The efficiency of microbial protein synthesis was highest with enzyme 2‐treated silage and lowest with formic acid‐treated silage (untreated, 35·4; formic acid, 25·2; enzyme 1, 30·4; enzyme 2, 39·4), but none of these differences were significant.

Journal

Grass & Forage ScienceWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1991

References

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