Environmental Management in Operations: The Selection of Environmental Technologies*

Environmental Management in Operations: The Selection of Environmental Technologies* Manufacturing firms have given management of the natural environment higher priority as public awareness and scrutiny has increased. To help understand management's role in this process, a basic conceptual model of environmental management within operations is developed. The model proposes that the general orientation of operations managers on environmental issues ranges from proactive to reactive, and this is intrinsically related to the investment pattern in environmental technologies. Results from an empirical validation of this model are presented for a sample of plants from the furniture industry. Three distinct groups were identified based on the linkage between environmental management orientation and investment in environmental technologies. Counter to the prescriptive environmental literature, which recommends that proactive orientation should emphasize pollution prevention (i.e., fundamental product and process changes), proactive managers implemented a balanced portfolio that also included a sizable proportion of pollution control technologies (i.e., traditional end‐of‐pipe controls and remediation). Contextual factors also differentiate among these three groups, thus suggesting options for senior management to assist plant managers to become more proactive and to improve environmental performance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Decision Sciences Wiley

Environmental Management in Operations: The Selection of Environmental Technologies*

Decision Sciences, Volume 30 (3) – Jun 1, 1999

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0011-7315
eISSN
1540-5915
DOI
10.1111/j.1540-5915.1999.tb00900.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Manufacturing firms have given management of the natural environment higher priority as public awareness and scrutiny has increased. To help understand management's role in this process, a basic conceptual model of environmental management within operations is developed. The model proposes that the general orientation of operations managers on environmental issues ranges from proactive to reactive, and this is intrinsically related to the investment pattern in environmental technologies. Results from an empirical validation of this model are presented for a sample of plants from the furniture industry. Three distinct groups were identified based on the linkage between environmental management orientation and investment in environmental technologies. Counter to the prescriptive environmental literature, which recommends that proactive orientation should emphasize pollution prevention (i.e., fundamental product and process changes), proactive managers implemented a balanced portfolio that also included a sizable proportion of pollution control technologies (i.e., traditional end‐of‐pipe controls and remediation). Contextual factors also differentiate among these three groups, thus suggesting options for senior management to assist plant managers to become more proactive and to improve environmental performance.

Journal

Decision SciencesWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1999

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

  • Development and validation of TQM implementation constructs
    Ahire, S. L.; Golhar, D. Y.; Waller, M. A.
  • An examination of the validity of two models of attitude
    Bagozzi, R. P.
  • The crucial interrelationship between manufacturing strategy and organizational culture
    Bates, K. A.; Amundson, S. D.; Schroeder, R. G.; Morris, W. T.
  • Testing structural equation models
    Bollen, K. A.; Stine, R. A.
  • Multivariate analysis
    Dillon, W. R.; Goldstein, M.
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  • Impact of government regulations on pollution performance of pulp and paper firms
    Freedman, M.; Jaggi, B.
  • Research in corporate social performance and policy (Vol. 7)
    Harris, R. A.
  • Research in corporate social performance and policy
    Henriques, I.; Sadorsky, P.
  • Research in the process and content of manufacturing strategy
    Leong, G. K.; Snyder, D. L.; Ward, P. T.

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