Environmental fate of nonylphenol ethoxylates: Differential adsorption of homologs to components of river sediment

Environmental fate of nonylphenol ethoxylates: Differential adsorption of homologs to components... Nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPEOx) homologs present in commercial mixtures were rapidly adsorbed to and desorbed from native river sediment. Adsorption isotherms, established using high‐performance liquid chromatography analysis to monitor individual homologs NPEO3 to NPEO13 simultaneously, were linear for each component adsorbing to native sediment, organic‐free sediment, and kaolinite, usually with small positive intercepts on the isotherms indicating an additional low‐capacity, high‐affinity binding site. The adsorption partition coefficients (Kd) for the native sediment decreased progressively from 1,460 L/kg for NPEO3 to 450 L/kg for NPEO10, then increased again slightly for higher homologs. In contrast, Kd values for organic‐free sediment (range 230–590 L/kg) or kaolinite (190–490 L/kg) increased steadily from NPEO3 to NPEO13. Adsorptions to silica and alumina were very weak, but to sewage sludge all components adsorbed strongly (Kd values 12,000–33,000, with a maximum at NPEO7). The adsorption to sewage sludge was related to the low‐capacity, high‐affinity sites observed for native sediment. Dependence of Kd values on ethoxylate chain length was analyzed, in terms of both possible adsorption mechanisms, and the environmental fate and impact of NPEOxs as endocrine disruptors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry Wiley

Environmental fate of nonylphenol ethoxylates: Differential adsorption of homologs to components of river sediment

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 SETAC
ISSN
0730-7268
eISSN
1552-8618
DOI
10.1002/etc.5620190207
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nonylphenol ethoxylate (NPEOx) homologs present in commercial mixtures were rapidly adsorbed to and desorbed from native river sediment. Adsorption isotherms, established using high‐performance liquid chromatography analysis to monitor individual homologs NPEO3 to NPEO13 simultaneously, were linear for each component adsorbing to native sediment, organic‐free sediment, and kaolinite, usually with small positive intercepts on the isotherms indicating an additional low‐capacity, high‐affinity binding site. The adsorption partition coefficients (Kd) for the native sediment decreased progressively from 1,460 L/kg for NPEO3 to 450 L/kg for NPEO10, then increased again slightly for higher homologs. In contrast, Kd values for organic‐free sediment (range 230–590 L/kg) or kaolinite (190–490 L/kg) increased steadily from NPEO3 to NPEO13. Adsorptions to silica and alumina were very weak, but to sewage sludge all components adsorbed strongly (Kd values 12,000–33,000, with a maximum at NPEO7). The adsorption to sewage sludge was related to the low‐capacity, high‐affinity sites observed for native sediment. Dependence of Kd values on ethoxylate chain length was analyzed, in terms of both possible adsorption mechanisms, and the environmental fate and impact of NPEOxs as endocrine disruptors.

Journal

Environmental Toxicology & ChemistryWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2000

References

  • Comparative adsorption of natural and commercially available humic acids to river sediments
    Marshall, Marshall; House, House; Russell, Russell; White, White
  • Sorption of alcohol ethoxylate surfactant to natural sediments
    Cano, Cano; Dorn, Dorn
  • Seasonal variability of the organic matter in a sedimentary coastal environment: Sources, degradation and accumulation (continental shelf of the Gulf of Lions‐northwestern Mediterranean Sea)
    Buscail, Buscail; Pocklington, Pocklington; Germain, Germain

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