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Entrepreneurial Expectancy, Task Effort, and Performance

Entrepreneurial Expectancy, Task Effort, and Performance Research to date has not adequately explained the role that expectancy of entrepreneurial performance based on perceived ability plays in motivating persons to persevere on an entrepreneurial task. This study investigated the entrepreneurial expectancy, effort‐performance linkage via a World Wide Web–based experiment involving 179 undergraduate business students at a large midwestern university. Results indicated that the type of feedback (positive versus negative) that individuals received regarding their entrepreneurial ability (regardless of actual ability) changed expectancies regarding future business start‐up, but did not alter task effort or quality of performance. Individuals receiving positive feedback about their entrepreneurial abilities had higher entrepreneurial expectancies than individuals receiving negative feedback. We also found that males had higher expectancies regardless of experimental condition than females. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1042-2587
eISSN
1540-6520
DOI
10.1111/1540-8520.00006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Research to date has not adequately explained the role that expectancy of entrepreneurial performance based on perceived ability plays in motivating persons to persevere on an entrepreneurial task. This study investigated the entrepreneurial expectancy, effort‐performance linkage via a World Wide Web–based experiment involving 179 undergraduate business students at a large midwestern university. Results indicated that the type of feedback (positive versus negative) that individuals received regarding their entrepreneurial ability (regardless of actual ability) changed expectancies regarding future business start‐up, but did not alter task effort or quality of performance. Individuals receiving positive feedback about their entrepreneurial abilities had higher entrepreneurial expectancies than individuals receiving negative feedback. We also found that males had higher expectancies regardless of experimental condition than females.

Journal

Entrepreneurship Theory and PracticeWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2002

References

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