Enhancement of mechanical performance of striated muscle by stretch during contraction

Enhancement of mechanical performance of striated muscle by stretch during contraction M. I. M. NOBLE Academic Unit of Cardiovascular Medicine, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, 17 Horseferry Road, London SW1P 2AR (MANUSCRIPT RECEIVED 30 SEPTEMBER 1991, ACCEPTED 6 JANUARY 1992) CONTENTS PAGE Introduction The experimental data Force enhancement during and after stretch Component 1: velocity-dependent force enhancement during stretch Component 2: a force component recruited by a critical sarcomere extension (not increased by further extension), which decays with time Component 3: residual force enhancement after stretch of contracting muscle Structural explanations of force enhancement by active stretch: connectin and nebulin X-ray diffraction studies Energetic considerations: heat production and ATP consumption Simulation of force enhancement by active stretch by muscle models Conclusion References INTRODUCTION Most physiologists and medical students know that when a striated muscle is stimulated, if that muscle has been stretched at rest beyond the optimum length for overlap of actin and myosin filaments, there is a reduction in force production (Ramsey & Street, 1940; Edman, 1966; Gordon, Huxley & Julian, 1966). Fewer know that stretch of striated muscle whilst contracting beyond the optimum length for overlap of actin and myosin filaments increases force production which then remains at a higher level (Fenn, 1924; Abbot, Aubert & http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experimental Physiology Wiley

Enhancement of mechanical performance of striated muscle by stretch during contraction

Experimental Physiology, Volume 77 (4) – Jul 1, 1992

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/enhancement-of-mechanical-performance-of-striated-muscle-by-stretch-GJWSJOGRp0
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2014 The Physiological Society
ISSN
0958-0670
eISSN
1469-445X
DOI
10.1113/expphysiol.1992.sp003618
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

M. I. M. NOBLE Academic Unit of Cardiovascular Medicine, Charing Cross and Westminster Medical School, 17 Horseferry Road, London SW1P 2AR (MANUSCRIPT RECEIVED 30 SEPTEMBER 1991, ACCEPTED 6 JANUARY 1992) CONTENTS PAGE Introduction The experimental data Force enhancement during and after stretch Component 1: velocity-dependent force enhancement during stretch Component 2: a force component recruited by a critical sarcomere extension (not increased by further extension), which decays with time Component 3: residual force enhancement after stretch of contracting muscle Structural explanations of force enhancement by active stretch: connectin and nebulin X-ray diffraction studies Energetic considerations: heat production and ATP consumption Simulation of force enhancement by active stretch by muscle models Conclusion References INTRODUCTION Most physiologists and medical students know that when a striated muscle is stimulated, if that muscle has been stretched at rest beyond the optimum length for overlap of actin and myosin filaments, there is a reduction in force production (Ramsey & Street, 1940; Edman, 1966; Gordon, Huxley & Julian, 1966). Fewer know that stretch of striated muscle whilst contracting beyond the optimum length for overlap of actin and myosin filaments increases force production which then remains at a higher level (Fenn, 1924; Abbot, Aubert &

Journal

Experimental PhysiologyWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1992

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month