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Enhanced visual performance in obsessive compulsive personality disorder

Enhanced visual performance in obsessive compulsive personality disorder Visual performance is considered as commanding modality in human perception. We tested whether Obsessive–compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) people do differently in visual performance tasks than people without OCPD. One hundred ten students of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad and non‐student participants were tested by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM‐IV Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID‐II), among whom 18 (mean age = 29.55; SD = 5.26; 84% female) met the criteria for OCPD classification; controls were 20 persons (mean age = 27.85; SD = 5.26; female = 84%), who did not met the OCPD criteria. Both groups were tested on a modified Flicker task for two dimensions of visual performance (i.e., visual acuity: detecting the location of change, complexity, and size; and visual contrast sensitivity). The OCPD group had responded more accurately on pairs related to size, complexity, and contrast, but spent more time to detect a change on pairs related to complexity and contrast. The OCPD individuals seem to have more accurate visual performance than non‐OCPD controls. The findings support the relationship between personality characteristics and visual performance within the framework of top‐down processing model. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Psychology Wiley

Enhanced visual performance in obsessive compulsive personality disorder

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2016 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0036-5564
eISSN
1467-9450
DOI
10.1111/sjop.12312
pmid
27447368
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Visual performance is considered as commanding modality in human perception. We tested whether Obsessive–compulsive personality disorder (OCPD) people do differently in visual performance tasks than people without OCPD. One hundred ten students of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad and non‐student participants were tested by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM‐IV Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID‐II), among whom 18 (mean age = 29.55; SD = 5.26; 84% female) met the criteria for OCPD classification; controls were 20 persons (mean age = 27.85; SD = 5.26; female = 84%), who did not met the OCPD criteria. Both groups were tested on a modified Flicker task for two dimensions of visual performance (i.e., visual acuity: detecting the location of change, complexity, and size; and visual contrast sensitivity). The OCPD group had responded more accurately on pairs related to size, complexity, and contrast, but spent more time to detect a change on pairs related to complexity and contrast. The OCPD individuals seem to have more accurate visual performance than non‐OCPD controls. The findings support the relationship between personality characteristics and visual performance within the framework of top‐down processing model.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of PsychologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2016

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References