Enhanced Crystallinity of h‐BN Films Induced by Substrate Bias During Magnetron Sputtering

Enhanced Crystallinity of h‐BN Films Induced by Substrate Bias During Magnetron Sputtering IntroductionMonolayer and bilayer hexagonal boron nitride (h‐BN) have an important role as a lattice‐matched large band gap insulator for 2D devices made from graphene and dichalcogenide semiconductors. Also, reports over the last few years on the high temperature oxidation resistance of h‐BN films have shown their utility as a protective thin film capping layer. The most common means of growing h‐BN is by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at high temperatures (≈1000 °C) on lattice matched substrates such as Cu or Ni. It has repeatedly been shown that polycrystalline flakes of h‐BN can be grown with a typical film thickness <10 monolayers, and these flakes can be transferred from the growth substrate to other surfaces with minimal damage. Recently, large millimeter‐sized h‐BN domains grown by ion beam sputtering on Ni substrates has been reported, and it is apparent that minimization of defects on the substrate is key to achieving large enough domains for electronic applications.For future technological applications, physical vapor deposition methods using pulsed lasers, ion beams, or magnetron sputtering are attractive for h‐BN film growth since physical vapor deposition is adaptable to large‐scale manufacturing and modern lithography processes. Since overall device performance is dominated by the degree of film homogeneity http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Physica Status Solidi (B) Basic Solid State Physics Wiley

Enhanced Crystallinity of h‐BN Films Induced by Substrate Bias During Magnetron Sputtering

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/enhanced-crystallinity-of-h-bn-films-induced-by-substrate-bias-during-MxUsDhT4PW
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
ISSN
0370-1972
eISSN
1521-3951
D.O.I.
10.1002/pssb.201700458
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionMonolayer and bilayer hexagonal boron nitride (h‐BN) have an important role as a lattice‐matched large band gap insulator for 2D devices made from graphene and dichalcogenide semiconductors. Also, reports over the last few years on the high temperature oxidation resistance of h‐BN films have shown their utility as a protective thin film capping layer. The most common means of growing h‐BN is by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at high temperatures (≈1000 °C) on lattice matched substrates such as Cu or Ni. It has repeatedly been shown that polycrystalline flakes of h‐BN can be grown with a typical film thickness <10 monolayers, and these flakes can be transferred from the growth substrate to other surfaces with minimal damage. Recently, large millimeter‐sized h‐BN domains grown by ion beam sputtering on Ni substrates has been reported, and it is apparent that minimization of defects on the substrate is key to achieving large enough domains for electronic applications.For future technological applications, physical vapor deposition methods using pulsed lasers, ion beams, or magnetron sputtering are attractive for h‐BN film growth since physical vapor deposition is adaptable to large‐scale manufacturing and modern lithography processes. Since overall device performance is dominated by the degree of film homogeneity

Journal

Physica Status Solidi (B) Basic Solid State PhysicsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off