Engineering human bone grafts with new macroporous calcium phosphate cement scaffolds

Engineering human bone grafts with new macroporous calcium phosphate cement scaffolds Bone engineering opens the possibility to grow large amounts of tissue products by combining patient‐specific cells with compliant biomaterials. Decellularized tissue matrices represent suitable biomaterials, but availability, long processing time, excessive cost, and concerns on pathogen transmission have led to the development of biomimetic synthetic alternatives. We recently fabricated calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds with variable macroporosity using a facile synthesis method with minimal manufacturing steps and demonstrated long‐term biocompatibility in vitro. However, there is no knowledge on the potential use of these scaffolds for bone engineering and whether the porosity of the scaffolds affects osteogenic differentiation and tissue formation in vitro. In this study, we explored the bone engineering potential of CPC scaffolds with two different macroporosities using human mesenchymal progenitors derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC‐MP) or isolated from bone marrow (BMSC). Biomimetic decellularized bone scaffolds were used as reference material in all experiments. The results demonstrate that, irrespective of their macroporosity, the CPC scaffolds tested in this study support attachment, viability, and growth of iPSC‐MP and BMSC cells similarly to decellularized bone. Importantly, the tested materials sustained differentiation of the cells as evidenced by increased expression of osteogenic markers and formation of a mineralized tissue. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the CPC scaffolds fabricated using our method are suitable to engineer bone grafts from different cell sources and could lead to the development of safe and more affordable tissue grafts for reconstructive dentistry and orthopaedics and in vitro models for basic and applied research. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine Wiley
Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/engineering-human-bone-grafts-with-new-macroporous-calcium-phosphate-0MOxx7jmVT
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1932-6254
eISSN
1932-7005
D.O.I.
10.1002/term.2491
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Bone engineering opens the possibility to grow large amounts of tissue products by combining patient‐specific cells with compliant biomaterials. Decellularized tissue matrices represent suitable biomaterials, but availability, long processing time, excessive cost, and concerns on pathogen transmission have led to the development of biomimetic synthetic alternatives. We recently fabricated calcium phosphate cement (CPC) scaffolds with variable macroporosity using a facile synthesis method with minimal manufacturing steps and demonstrated long‐term biocompatibility in vitro. However, there is no knowledge on the potential use of these scaffolds for bone engineering and whether the porosity of the scaffolds affects osteogenic differentiation and tissue formation in vitro. In this study, we explored the bone engineering potential of CPC scaffolds with two different macroporosities using human mesenchymal progenitors derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC‐MP) or isolated from bone marrow (BMSC). Biomimetic decellularized bone scaffolds were used as reference material in all experiments. The results demonstrate that, irrespective of their macroporosity, the CPC scaffolds tested in this study support attachment, viability, and growth of iPSC‐MP and BMSC cells similarly to decellularized bone. Importantly, the tested materials sustained differentiation of the cells as evidenced by increased expression of osteogenic markers and formation of a mineralized tissue. In conclusion, the results of this study suggest that the CPC scaffolds fabricated using our method are suitable to engineer bone grafts from different cell sources and could lead to the development of safe and more affordable tissue grafts for reconstructive dentistry and orthopaedics and in vitro models for basic and applied research.

Journal

Journal of Tissue Engineering and Regenerative MedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off