Endothelial dysfunction may promote keloid growth

Endothelial dysfunction may promote keloid growth Keloid is a cutaneous fibroproliferative disorder. It results from impaired wound healing that generates persistent inflammation and extensive deposition of collagen fibers in the wound/scar. Keloids tend to be worse in hypertensive patients. The present prospective cross‐sectional study assessed whether endothelial dysfunction, which occurs in hypertension, associates with keloid formation and progression. This study included randomly selected patients with keloids who were assessed for surgical keloid treatment in 2013–2014. A series of nonkeloid patients admitted to the hospital was also recruited during this period. To measure endothelial function, all patients underwent digital reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry. Test results were expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI) and augmentation index (AI). In total, 57 patients with keloids and 19 nonkeloid controls were recruited. Keloid patients did not differ from the controls in terms of demographic or clinical variables, but had significantly worse RHI and AI values. Moreover, poor RHI and AI values associated with keloid development on binomial logistic regression. The keloid patients were then divided into four groups depending on whether their keloids started at age 0–12, 13–18, 19–29, or ≥30 years. Patients whose keloids arose before and well after puberty tended to have lower RHI than the controls, but these differences did not achieve statistical significance. However, these two groups did have significantly poorer AI values than the controls. Thus, endothelial dysfunction could cause keloid formation and/or aggravation. This indicates that vascular endothelial cells are important for wound healing. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Wound Repair and Regeneration Wiley

Endothelial dysfunction may promote keloid growth

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2017 by the Wound Healing Society
ISSN
1067-1927
eISSN
1524-475X
D.O.I.
10.1111/wrr.12601
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Keloid is a cutaneous fibroproliferative disorder. It results from impaired wound healing that generates persistent inflammation and extensive deposition of collagen fibers in the wound/scar. Keloids tend to be worse in hypertensive patients. The present prospective cross‐sectional study assessed whether endothelial dysfunction, which occurs in hypertension, associates with keloid formation and progression. This study included randomly selected patients with keloids who were assessed for surgical keloid treatment in 2013–2014. A series of nonkeloid patients admitted to the hospital was also recruited during this period. To measure endothelial function, all patients underwent digital reactive hyperemia peripheral arterial tonometry. Test results were expressed as reactive hyperemia index (RHI) and augmentation index (AI). In total, 57 patients with keloids and 19 nonkeloid controls were recruited. Keloid patients did not differ from the controls in terms of demographic or clinical variables, but had significantly worse RHI and AI values. Moreover, poor RHI and AI values associated with keloid development on binomial logistic regression. The keloid patients were then divided into four groups depending on whether their keloids started at age 0–12, 13–18, 19–29, or ≥30 years. Patients whose keloids arose before and well after puberty tended to have lower RHI than the controls, but these differences did not achieve statistical significance. However, these two groups did have significantly poorer AI values than the controls. Thus, endothelial dysfunction could cause keloid formation and/or aggravation. This indicates that vascular endothelial cells are important for wound healing.

Journal

Wound Repair and RegenerationWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2017

References

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