Employee attitudes toward job changes: An application and extension of Rusbult and Farrell's investment model

Employee attitudes toward job changes: An application and extension of Rusbult and Farrell's... The present study applied and extended Rusbult and Farrell's (1983) investment model to investigate employees' attitudes toward different job changes, that is, changing job content, changing department, relocation, and voluntary turnover. Employees of three hospitals filled out a questionnaire (N=953; response rate 55%). The data generally supported the model. Employees who perceived a more favourable job rewards‐costs ratio reported greater satisfaction and affective commitment, and were less positive toward changing their present working situation. The same was true for employees who reported less job alternatives, more investments, and a larger continuance commitment. In addition, employees' expectations of the benefits and costs associated with job changes, weighed by their valence, were related to job change attitudes. Although the predictors' impact varied with job change, the results suggested that attitudes toward different, internal and external, job changes may have similar determinants. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology Wiley

Employee attitudes toward job changes: An application and extension of Rusbult and Farrell's investment model

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2005 The British Psychological Society
ISSN
0963-1798
eISSN
2044-8325
DOI
10.1348/096317904X23745
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study applied and extended Rusbult and Farrell's (1983) investment model to investigate employees' attitudes toward different job changes, that is, changing job content, changing department, relocation, and voluntary turnover. Employees of three hospitals filled out a questionnaire (N=953; response rate 55%). The data generally supported the model. Employees who perceived a more favourable job rewards‐costs ratio reported greater satisfaction and affective commitment, and were less positive toward changing their present working situation. The same was true for employees who reported less job alternatives, more investments, and a larger continuance commitment. In addition, employees' expectations of the benefits and costs associated with job changes, weighed by their valence, were related to job change attitudes. Although the predictors' impact varied with job change, the results suggested that attitudes toward different, internal and external, job changes may have similar determinants. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

Journal

Journal of Occupational and Organizational PsychologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2005

References

  • Pulling up roots in the 1990s: Who is willing to relocate?
    Brett, Brett; Stroh, Stroh; Reilly, Reilly
  • Employee transfer and employee turnover: A theoretical and practical disconnect?
    Dalton, Dalton
  • Predicting college student satisfaction, commitment, and attrition from investment model constructs
    Hatcher, Hatcher; Kryer, Kryer; Prus, Prus; Fitzgerald, Fitzgerald
  • Intraorganizational mobility and work related attitudes
    McElroy, McElroy; Morrow, Morrow; Mullen, Mullen
  • Job satisfaction, organizational commitment, turnover intention, and turnover: Path analyses based on meta‐analytic findings
    Tett, Tett; Meyer, Meyer
  • Understanding experts' attitudes toward functional flexibility
    Dam, Dam

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