Employability in the finance sector: rhetoric vs reality

Employability in the finance sector: rhetoric vs reality wo seemingly irreconcilable themes recur in the addresses given by the recent presidents of the Chartered Institute of Bankers. First, as the benign competition of the eighties becomes a malign one in the nineties, banks will undergo even more dramatic changes. Second, in the newly evolving market place, the role of staff in providing quality service will be greater than ever before. For example, in the 1990 presidential address, Charlton (1990: 9-10) argued that: The sweeping away of market barriers has turned money into a commodity product, and it is only possible to make attractive returns out of selling a commodity to the extent that you can differentiate the way in which you deliver it from the way in which the next chap does. The basis of that differentiation is customer service ...A commitment to service, right down to the organisation, is the key. Against the background of these imperatives, in his 1993 presidential address Sir Brian Pearse (1993:lO)identified some of the downsides looming on the horizon: The financial services industry has lost some 70,000 jobs over the last four years ... Then? is an almost total lack of recruitment, apart from relatively few graduates. This will leave http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Resource Management Journal Wiley

Employability in the finance sector: rhetoric vs reality

Human Resource Management Journal, Volume 7 (1) – Jan 1, 1997

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0954-5395
eISSN
1748-8583
DOI
10.1111/j.1748-8583.1997.tb00275.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

wo seemingly irreconcilable themes recur in the addresses given by the recent presidents of the Chartered Institute of Bankers. First, as the benign competition of the eighties becomes a malign one in the nineties, banks will undergo even more dramatic changes. Second, in the newly evolving market place, the role of staff in providing quality service will be greater than ever before. For example, in the 1990 presidential address, Charlton (1990: 9-10) argued that: The sweeping away of market barriers has turned money into a commodity product, and it is only possible to make attractive returns out of selling a commodity to the extent that you can differentiate the way in which you deliver it from the way in which the next chap does. The basis of that differentiation is customer service ...A commitment to service, right down to the organisation, is the key. Against the background of these imperatives, in his 1993 presidential address Sir Brian Pearse (1993:lO)identified some of the downsides looming on the horizon: The financial services industry has lost some 70,000 jobs over the last four years ... Then? is an almost total lack of recruitment, apart from relatively few graduates. This will leave

Journal

Human Resource Management JournalWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1997

References

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