Emerging Association Between Parathyroid Hormone and Anemia in Hemodialysis Patients

Emerging Association Between Parathyroid Hormone and Anemia in Hemodialysis Patients Anemia is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). There are various causes of renal anemia such as decreased production of erythropoietin, resistance to erythropoietin, shortened survival of red blood cells, and bone marrow fibrosis. Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a less recognized, but potentially significant cause of renal anemia in CKD patients. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) has been regarded as a uremic toxin that has multiple adverse effects, and its elevated levels have been associated with renal anemia in hemodialysis patients. Moreover, recent clinical studies have shown that the treatment of SHPT using either vitamin D receptor activators, calcimimetics, or parathyroidectomy leads to improvement of anemia, supporting the role of PTH in renal anemia. Emerging data have also indicated the involvement of bone‐derived fibroblast growth factor 23 in renal anemia. This review summarizes recent insights into the role of PTH in renal anemia and discusses the importance of treating SHPT in improving the control of renal anemia in hemodialysis patients. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis Wiley

Emerging Association Between Parathyroid Hormone and Anemia in Hemodialysis Patients

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy
ISSN
1744-9979
eISSN
1744-9987
D.O.I.
10.1111/1744-9987.12685
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Anemia is a common complication of chronic kidney disease (CKD). There are various causes of renal anemia such as decreased production of erythropoietin, resistance to erythropoietin, shortened survival of red blood cells, and bone marrow fibrosis. Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a less recognized, but potentially significant cause of renal anemia in CKD patients. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) has been regarded as a uremic toxin that has multiple adverse effects, and its elevated levels have been associated with renal anemia in hemodialysis patients. Moreover, recent clinical studies have shown that the treatment of SHPT using either vitamin D receptor activators, calcimimetics, or parathyroidectomy leads to improvement of anemia, supporting the role of PTH in renal anemia. Emerging data have also indicated the involvement of bone‐derived fibroblast growth factor 23 in renal anemia. This review summarizes recent insights into the role of PTH in renal anemia and discusses the importance of treating SHPT in improving the control of renal anemia in hemodialysis patients.

Journal

Therapeutic Apheresis and DialysisWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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