Electron microscopy of frozen water and aqueous solutions

Electron microscopy of frozen water and aqueous solutions Thin layers of pure water or aqueous solutions are frozen in the vitreous state or with the water phase in the form of hexagonal or cubic crystals, either by using a spray‐freezing method or by spreading the liquid on alkylamine treated films. The specimens are observed in a conventional and in a scanning transmission electron microscope at temperatures down to 25 K. In general, the formation of crystals and segregation of solutes during freezing, devitrification and evaporation upon warming, take place as foreseen by previous X‐ray, thermal, optical and electron microscopical studies. Electron beam damage appears in three forms. The devitrification of vitreous ice. The slow loss of material for the specimen at a rate of about one molecule of pure water for every sixty electrons. The bubbling in solutions of organic material for doses in the range of thousands of e nm−2. We propose a possible model for the mechanism of beam damage in aqueous solutions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Microscopy Wiley

Electron microscopy of frozen water and aqueous solutions

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1982 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-2720
eISSN
1365-2818
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2818.1982.tb04625.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Thin layers of pure water or aqueous solutions are frozen in the vitreous state or with the water phase in the form of hexagonal or cubic crystals, either by using a spray‐freezing method or by spreading the liquid on alkylamine treated films. The specimens are observed in a conventional and in a scanning transmission electron microscope at temperatures down to 25 K. In general, the formation of crystals and segregation of solutes during freezing, devitrification and evaporation upon warming, take place as foreseen by previous X‐ray, thermal, optical and electron microscopical studies. Electron beam damage appears in three forms. The devitrification of vitreous ice. The slow loss of material for the specimen at a rate of about one molecule of pure water for every sixty electrons. The bubbling in solutions of organic material for doses in the range of thousands of e nm−2. We propose a possible model for the mechanism of beam damage in aqueous solutions.

Journal

Journal of MicroscopyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1982

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

  • Mechanisms of contrast and image formation of biological specimens in the transmission electron microscope
    Burge, R.E.
  • Molecular weight determination by scanning transmission electron microscopy
    Engel, A.
  • Low temperature preparation techniques for electron microscopy of biological specimens based on rapid freezing with liquid helium II
    Fernandez‐Moran, H.
  • Comparative mass measurements of biological macromolecules by transmission electron microscopy
    Freeman, R.; Leonard, K.R.

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