Electron microscopy of frozen biological suspensions

Electron microscopy of frozen biological suspensions The methodology for preparing specimens in the frozen, hydrated state has been assessed using crystals and T4 bacteriophages. The methods have also been demonstrated with lambda bacteriophages, purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium and fibres of DNA. For particles dispersed in an aqueous environment, it is shown that optimum structural preservation is obtained from a thin, quench‐frozen film with the bulk aqueous medium in the vitreous state. Crystallization of the bulk water may result in solute segregation and expulsion of the specimen from the film. Contrast measurements can be used to follow directly the state of hydration of a specimen during transition from the fully hydrated to the freeze‐dried state and permit direct measurement of the water content of the specimen. By changing the concentration and composition of the aqueous medium the contrast of particles in a vitreous film can be controlled and any state of negative, positive or zero contrast may be obtained. At 100 K, frozen‐hydrated, freeze‐dried or sugar embedded crystals can withstand a three‐ to four‐fold increase in electron exposure for the same damage when compared with similar sugar‐embedded or freeze‐dried samples at room temperature. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Microscopy Wiley

Electron microscopy of frozen biological suspensions

Journal of Microscopy, Volume 129 (1) – Jan 1, 1983

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/electron-microscopy-of-frozen-biological-suspensions-a8UUGWpM3Y
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1983 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-2720
eISSN
1365-2818
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2818.1983.tb04163.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The methodology for preparing specimens in the frozen, hydrated state has been assessed using crystals and T4 bacteriophages. The methods have also been demonstrated with lambda bacteriophages, purple membrane of Halobacterium halobium and fibres of DNA. For particles dispersed in an aqueous environment, it is shown that optimum structural preservation is obtained from a thin, quench‐frozen film with the bulk aqueous medium in the vitreous state. Crystallization of the bulk water may result in solute segregation and expulsion of the specimen from the film. Contrast measurements can be used to follow directly the state of hydration of a specimen during transition from the fully hydrated to the freeze‐dried state and permit direct measurement of the water content of the specimen. By changing the concentration and composition of the aqueous medium the contrast of particles in a vitreous film can be controlled and any state of negative, positive or zero contrast may be obtained. At 100 K, frozen‐hydrated, freeze‐dried or sugar embedded crystals can withstand a three‐ to four‐fold increase in electron exposure for the same damage when compared with similar sugar‐embedded or freeze‐dried samples at room temperature.

Journal

Journal of MicroscopyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1983

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off