EFFORT AS A CORRELATE OF ORGANIZATIONAL REWARD SYSTEM AND INDIVIDUAL VALUES

EFFORT AS A CORRELATE OF ORGANIZATIONAL REWARD SYSTEM AND INDIVIDUAL VALUES THE concept of organizational climate has been receiving increasing theoretical and research attention. The concept has been used to explain behavior in such diverse areas as career development (Hall, 1968; Schneider, 1968), managerial motivation (Dunnette, 1967; Porter & Lawler, 1968), leadership style (Fleishman & Harris, 1967; Korman, 1966) and salesman success (Schneider & Bartlett, 1968). Campbell (1968) has recently suggested that behavior in organizations is a result of the interaction of a number of the dimensions or factors that have been categorized under the heading “organizational climate” and individual differences. This would mean that neither organizational variables nor individual characteristics alone are the total determinants of behavior. This is not a new issue (Cronbach, 1957). The lack of field research on individual-environment interaction can be attributed to a general failure of industrial psychologists to consider both individuals and environments when predicting (as in personnel selection), or when controlling (as in establishing reward policies). Galbraith (1968) has summarized a model of behavior in or1Support for this research was provided by a Ford Foundation Research Grant t o the Department of Administrative Sciences, Yale University. We wish to express our appreciation to C. Argyris and D. T. Hall for their http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

EFFORT AS A CORRELATE OF ORGANIZATIONAL REWARD SYSTEM AND INDIVIDUAL VALUES

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1970 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6570.1970.tb01659.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE concept of organizational climate has been receiving increasing theoretical and research attention. The concept has been used to explain behavior in such diverse areas as career development (Hall, 1968; Schneider, 1968), managerial motivation (Dunnette, 1967; Porter & Lawler, 1968), leadership style (Fleishman & Harris, 1967; Korman, 1966) and salesman success (Schneider & Bartlett, 1968). Campbell (1968) has recently suggested that behavior in organizations is a result of the interaction of a number of the dimensions or factors that have been categorized under the heading “organizational climate” and individual differences. This would mean that neither organizational variables nor individual characteristics alone are the total determinants of behavior. This is not a new issue (Cronbach, 1957). The lack of field research on individual-environment interaction can be attributed to a general failure of industrial psychologists to consider both individuals and environments when predicting (as in personnel selection), or when controlling (as in establishing reward policies). Galbraith (1968) has summarized a model of behavior in or1Support for this research was provided by a Ford Foundation Research Grant t o the Department of Administrative Sciences, Yale University. We wish to express our appreciation to C. Argyris and D. T. Hall for their

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1970

References

  • Individual Differences and Organizational Climate, I: The Research Plan and Questionnaire Development
    Schneider, Schneider; Bartlett, Bartlett

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