Efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in combination with conventional antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection: a meta‐analysis of randomised controlled trials

Efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in combination with conventional antiviral therapy in... IntroductionMore than 170 million individuals have hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection worldwide, and approximately four million people are newly infected with HCV every year. Up to 80% of patients with HCV infection proceed to chronic hepatitis C (CHC), which can ultimately lead to the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma . Previously, the standard treatment of CHC was a combination therapy with weekly pegylated interferon‐α (Peg‐IFN‐α) injection and daily oral ribavirin (RBV) . For example, a large randomised trial reported that the combination therapy of Peg‐IFN‐α and RBV increased sustained viral response (SVR) up to 52% , which is defined as the absence of detectable HCV RNA 24 weeks after completion of antiviral therapy for CHC. Before first‐generation direct‐acting antivirals (DAAs) were licensed for use in HCV genotype 1 infection in 2011, their combination for 24 or 48 weeks was the approved treatment for CHC .In the meantime, observational epidemiological studies have reported that there is an association between low levels of vitamin D and the risk of CHC. A retrospective cohort study with 468 study participants showed that the mean level of vitamin D in noncirrhosis CHC patients was 17 ng mL−1 and 25% of them had http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Nutrition & Dietetics Wiley

Efficacy of vitamin D supplementation in combination with conventional antiviral therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C infection: a meta‐analysis of randomised controlled trials

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 The British Dietetic Association Ltd
ISSN
0952-3871
eISSN
1365-277X
D.O.I.
10.1111/jhn.12503
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionMore than 170 million individuals have hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection worldwide, and approximately four million people are newly infected with HCV every year. Up to 80% of patients with HCV infection proceed to chronic hepatitis C (CHC), which can ultimately lead to the development of liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma . Previously, the standard treatment of CHC was a combination therapy with weekly pegylated interferon‐α (Peg‐IFN‐α) injection and daily oral ribavirin (RBV) . For example, a large randomised trial reported that the combination therapy of Peg‐IFN‐α and RBV increased sustained viral response (SVR) up to 52% , which is defined as the absence of detectable HCV RNA 24 weeks after completion of antiviral therapy for CHC. Before first‐generation direct‐acting antivirals (DAAs) were licensed for use in HCV genotype 1 infection in 2011, their combination for 24 or 48 weeks was the approved treatment for CHC .In the meantime, observational epidemiological studies have reported that there is an association between low levels of vitamin D and the risk of CHC. A retrospective cohort study with 468 study participants showed that the mean level of vitamin D in noncirrhosis CHC patients was 17 ng mL−1 and 25% of them had

Journal

Journal of Human Nutrition & DieteticsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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