Effects of source‐sink relations on photosynthetic acclimation to elevated CO 2

Effects of source‐sink relations on photosynthetic acclimation to elevated CO 2 Abstract. While photosynthesis of C3 plants is stimulated by an increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration, photosynthetic capacity is often reduced after long‐term exposure to elevated CO2. This reduction appears to be brought about by end product inhibition, resulting from an imbalance in the supply and demand of carbohydrates. A review of the literature revealed that the reduction of photosynthetic capacity in elevated CO2 was most pronounced when the increased supply of carbohydrates was combined with small sink size. The volume of pots in which plants were grown affected the sink size by restricting root growth. While plants grown in small pots had a reduced photosynthetic capacity, plants grown in the field showed no reduction or an increase in this capacity. Pot volume also determined the effect of elevated CO2 on the root/shoot ratio: the root/shoot ratio increased when root growth was not restricted and decreased in plants grown in small pots. The data presented in this paper suggest that plants growing in the field will maintain a high photosynthetic capacity as the atmospheric CO2 level continues to rise. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell & Environment Wiley

Effects of source‐sink relations on photosynthetic acclimation to elevated CO 2

Plant Cell & Environment, Volume 14 (8) – Oct 1, 1991

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0140-7791
eISSN
1365-3040
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-3040.1991.tb01450.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. While photosynthesis of C3 plants is stimulated by an increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration, photosynthetic capacity is often reduced after long‐term exposure to elevated CO2. This reduction appears to be brought about by end product inhibition, resulting from an imbalance in the supply and demand of carbohydrates. A review of the literature revealed that the reduction of photosynthetic capacity in elevated CO2 was most pronounced when the increased supply of carbohydrates was combined with small sink size. The volume of pots in which plants were grown affected the sink size by restricting root growth. While plants grown in small pots had a reduced photosynthetic capacity, plants grown in the field showed no reduction or an increase in this capacity. Pot volume also determined the effect of elevated CO2 on the root/shoot ratio: the root/shoot ratio increased when root growth was not restricted and decreased in plants grown in small pots. The data presented in this paper suggest that plants growing in the field will maintain a high photosynthetic capacity as the atmospheric CO2 level continues to rise.

Journal

Plant Cell & EnvironmentWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1991

References

  • Increased photosynthetic capacity of Scirpus olneyi after 4 years of exposure to elevated CO 2
    Arp, Arp; Drake, Drake
  • Using growth analysis to interpret competition between a C 3 and a C 4 annual under ambient and elevated CO 2
    Bazzaz, Bazzaz; Garbutt, Garbutt; Reekie, Reekie; Williams, Williams
  • Photosynthetic response and adaptation to temperature in higher plants
    Berry, Berry; Björkman, Björkman
  • Effect of carbon dioxide enrichment on chlorophyll content, starch content and starch grain structure in Trifolium subterraneum leaves
    Cave, Cave; Tolley, Tolley; Strain, Strain
  • Sensing of atmospheric CO 2 by plants
    Mott, Mott
  • CO 2 enrichment of soybeans. Effect of leaf/pod ratio
    Peet, Peet
  • Effect of restricted root growth on carbohydrate metabolism and whole plant growth of Cucumis sativus L
    Robbing, Robbing; Pharr, Pharr
  • Growth and photosynthetic response of nine tropical species with long‐term exposure to elevated carbon dioxide
    Ziska, Ziska; Hogan, Hogan; Smith, Smith; Drake, Drake

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