Effects of opioid receptor blockade on the social behavior of rhesus monkeys living in large family groups

Effects of opioid receptor blockade on the social behavior of rhesus monkeys living in large... Rhesus monkeys of 9 weeks, 48 weeks, 100 weeks, 150 weeks of age (young subjects), or mature parous females that were not lactating were given acute single doses of the opioid antagonist naloxone (0.5 mg/kg) and vehicle on different days and observed in their familial social groups. Naloxone increased the occurrence of affiliative behaviors. Young subjects spent more time in contact with their mothers but showed no changes in social grooming. Maternal contact was actively sought through contact vocalizations, decreasing proximity, and, for the youngest infants, increased attempts to suckle. Mature females made more solicitations for grooming and received more grooming from their companions. These results are interpreted in terms of naloxone blocking the positive affect arising from social contact and thus causing subjects to seek further affiliative comfort. © 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Psychobiology Wiley

Effects of opioid receptor blockade on the social behavior of rhesus monkeys living in large family groups

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
ISSN
0012-1630
eISSN
1098-2302
DOI
10.1002/dev.420280202
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Rhesus monkeys of 9 weeks, 48 weeks, 100 weeks, 150 weeks of age (young subjects), or mature parous females that were not lactating were given acute single doses of the opioid antagonist naloxone (0.5 mg/kg) and vehicle on different days and observed in their familial social groups. Naloxone increased the occurrence of affiliative behaviors. Young subjects spent more time in contact with their mothers but showed no changes in social grooming. Maternal contact was actively sought through contact vocalizations, decreasing proximity, and, for the youngest infants, increased attempts to suckle. Mature females made more solicitations for grooming and received more grooming from their companions. These results are interpreted in terms of naloxone blocking the positive affect arising from social contact and thus causing subjects to seek further affiliative comfort. © 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Journal

Developmental PsychobiologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1995

References

  • Naloxone reduces social and exploratory activity in the rat
    File, File
  • Changes in the relationships of captive rhesus monkeys on giving birth
    Hinde, Hinde; Procter, Procter
  • Anxiety in rhesus monkey infants in relation to interactions with their mothers and social companions
    Maestripieri, Maestripieri; Martel, Martel; Nevison, Nevison; Simpson, Simpson; Keverne, Keverne
  • The interpretation of individual differences in rhesus monkey infants
    Simpson, Simpson; Howe, Howe

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