Effects of interdecadal climate variability on the oceanic ecosystems of the NE Pacific

Effects of interdecadal climate variability on the oceanic ecosystems of the NE Pacific A major reorganization of the North‐east Pacific biota transpired following a climatic `regime shift' in the mid 1970s. In this paper, we characterize the effects of interdecadal climate forcing on the oceanic ecosystems of the NE Pacific Ocean. We consider the concept of scale in terms of both time and space within the North Pacific ecosystem and develop a conceptual model to illustrate how climate variability is linked to ecosystem change. Next we describe a number of recent studies relating climate to marine ecosystem dynamics in the NE Pacific Ocean. These studies have focused on most major components of marine ecosystems – primary and secondary producers, forage species, and several levels of predators. They have been undertaken at different time and space scales. However, taken together, they reveal a more coherent picture of how decadal‐scale climate forcing may affect the large oceanic ecosystems of the NE Pacific. Finally, we synthesize the insight gained from interpreting these studies. Several general conclusions can be drawn. 1 There are large‐scale, low‐frequency, and sometimes very rapid changes in the distribution of atmospheric pressure over the North Pacific which are, in turn, reflected in ocean properties and circulation. 2 Oceanic ecosystems respond on similar time and space scales to variations in physical conditions. 3 Linkages between the atmosphere/ocean physics and biological responses are often different across time and space scales. 4 While the cases presented here demonstrate oceanic ecosystem response to climate forcing, they provide only hints of the mechanisms of interaction. 5 A model whereby ecosystem response to specified climate variation can be successfully predicted will be difficult to achieve because of scale mismatches and nonlinearities in the atmosphere–ocean–biosphere system. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Fisheries Oceanography Wiley

Effects of interdecadal climate variability on the oceanic ecosystems of the NE Pacific

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1054-6006
eISSN
1365-2419
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-2419.1998.00052.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A major reorganization of the North‐east Pacific biota transpired following a climatic `regime shift' in the mid 1970s. In this paper, we characterize the effects of interdecadal climate forcing on the oceanic ecosystems of the NE Pacific Ocean. We consider the concept of scale in terms of both time and space within the North Pacific ecosystem and develop a conceptual model to illustrate how climate variability is linked to ecosystem change. Next we describe a number of recent studies relating climate to marine ecosystem dynamics in the NE Pacific Ocean. These studies have focused on most major components of marine ecosystems – primary and secondary producers, forage species, and several levels of predators. They have been undertaken at different time and space scales. However, taken together, they reveal a more coherent picture of how decadal‐scale climate forcing may affect the large oceanic ecosystems of the NE Pacific. Finally, we synthesize the insight gained from interpreting these studies. Several general conclusions can be drawn. 1 There are large‐scale, low‐frequency, and sometimes very rapid changes in the distribution of atmospheric pressure over the North Pacific which are, in turn, reflected in ocean properties and circulation. 2 Oceanic ecosystems respond on similar time and space scales to variations in physical conditions. 3 Linkages between the atmosphere/ocean physics and biological responses are often different across time and space scales. 4 While the cases presented here demonstrate oceanic ecosystem response to climate forcing, they provide only hints of the mechanisms of interaction. 5 A model whereby ecosystem response to specified climate variation can be successfully predicted will be difficult to achieve because of scale mismatches and nonlinearities in the atmosphere–ocean–biosphere system.

Journal

Fisheries OceanographyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1998

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