Effects of Forest Fragmentation on Understory Hummingbirds in Amazonian Brazil

Effects of Forest Fragmentation on Understory Hummingbirds in Amazonian Brazil Abstract: We sampled understory bummingbirds in Amazonian forest fragments from before isolation through nine years after isolation. We recorded 377 captures of eight species in five 1‐ba fragments and four 10‐ha fragments. The three species netted before isolation, Phaethornis superciliosus, Phaethornis bourcieri, and Thalurania furcata, were nearly equally abundant at that time. After isolation abundance of P. bourcieri and T. furcata did not change, but P. superciliosus became nearly twice as common. Five additional species that were netted only after isolation represented about 10% of the post‐isolation sample. The species recorded only after isolation were forest species usually found above the levels of nets; fragments were not colonized by nonforest species. Use of fragments did not differ between 1‐and 10‐ba fragments. The landscape surrounding the fragments included active cattle pasture, abandoned pasture, and Cecropia‐dominated second growth, but this variation bad little effect on use of fragments by hummingbirds. The results suggest that these understory hummingbirds can persist in a matrix of fragments, secondary growth, and large forest patches. This response is much different than that of the insectivorous birds that dominate the understory bird community at the site, which are much more vulnerable to fragmentation. Efectos de la fragmentación del bosque sobre los colibrís de sotobosque en la Amazonia Brasileña http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Effects of Forest Fragmentation on Understory Hummingbirds in Amazonian Brazil

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1523-1739.1995.9051072.x-i1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: We sampled understory bummingbirds in Amazonian forest fragments from before isolation through nine years after isolation. We recorded 377 captures of eight species in five 1‐ba fragments and four 10‐ha fragments. The three species netted before isolation, Phaethornis superciliosus, Phaethornis bourcieri, and Thalurania furcata, were nearly equally abundant at that time. After isolation abundance of P. bourcieri and T. furcata did not change, but P. superciliosus became nearly twice as common. Five additional species that were netted only after isolation represented about 10% of the post‐isolation sample. The species recorded only after isolation were forest species usually found above the levels of nets; fragments were not colonized by nonforest species. Use of fragments did not differ between 1‐and 10‐ba fragments. The landscape surrounding the fragments included active cattle pasture, abandoned pasture, and Cecropia‐dominated second growth, but this variation bad little effect on use of fragments by hummingbirds. The results suggest that these understory hummingbirds can persist in a matrix of fragments, secondary growth, and large forest patches. This response is much different than that of the insectivorous birds that dominate the understory bird community at the site, which are much more vulnerable to fragmentation. Efectos de la fragmentación del bosque sobre los colibrís de sotobosque en la Amazonia Brasileña

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1995

References

  • Conservation of fragmented populations
    Fahrig, Fahrig; Merriam, Merriam
  • Forest fragmentation and bird extinction: San Antonio eighty years later
    Kattan, Kattan; Alvarez‐Lopez, Alvarez‐Lopez; Giraldo, Giraldo
  • The number of butterfly species in woodlands
    Shreeve, Shreeve; Mason, Mason
  • Influence of selective logging on bird species diversity in a Guianan rain forest
    Thiollay, Thiollay
  • Birds and army ants
    Willis, Willis; Oniki, Oniki
  • Avian communities of fragmented south‐temperate rainforests in Chile
    Willson, Willson; DeSanto, DeSanto; Sabag, Sabag; Armesto, Armesto

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