Effects of Forest Fragmentation on Recruitment Patterns in Amazonian Tree Communities

Effects of Forest Fragmentation on Recruitment Patterns in Amazonian Tree Communities Introduction Fragmentation can alter the ecology of rain forest remnants in many ways, but its long‐term effects on tree communities are poorly understood. One phenomenon that has received little attention is tree regeneration in fragmented forests ( Janzen 1983 ; Viana et al. 1997 ). Patterns of regeneration are important because they will ultimately determine the floristic composition of the remnant. Janzen (1983) suggested that fragments of tropical dry forest in Costa Rica are prone to invasions of weedy, generalist plant species from the surrounding modified matrix, which could progressively alter the floristic composition of remnants. Laurance (1991 , 1997 ) proposed that fragments in some tropical regions are chronically disturbed by winds and other factors and may exhibit a general shift toward successional trees, lianas, and vines adapted for recurring disturbance. Using data collected over 13 years, we describe patterns of tree recruitment in a fragmented landscape in central Amazonia. We ask three questions: (1) Do rates of tree recruitment differ between fragmented and continuous forests? (2) Are recruitment rates influenced by fragment area, age, and proximity of forest edge? (3) Are regenerating trees in fragments biased toward successional species or against old‐growth species? Methods Study Area http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Effects of Forest Fragmentation on Recruitment Patterns in Amazonian Tree Communities

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/effects-of-forest-fragmentation-on-recruitment-patterns-in-amazonian-gfjqcRP64U
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Society for Conservation Biology
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1111/j.1523-1739.1998.97175.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction Fragmentation can alter the ecology of rain forest remnants in many ways, but its long‐term effects on tree communities are poorly understood. One phenomenon that has received little attention is tree regeneration in fragmented forests ( Janzen 1983 ; Viana et al. 1997 ). Patterns of regeneration are important because they will ultimately determine the floristic composition of the remnant. Janzen (1983) suggested that fragments of tropical dry forest in Costa Rica are prone to invasions of weedy, generalist plant species from the surrounding modified matrix, which could progressively alter the floristic composition of remnants. Laurance (1991 , 1997 ) proposed that fragments in some tropical regions are chronically disturbed by winds and other factors and may exhibit a general shift toward successional trees, lianas, and vines adapted for recurring disturbance. Using data collected over 13 years, we describe patterns of tree recruitment in a fragmented landscape in central Amazonia. We ask three questions: (1) Do rates of tree recruitment differ between fragmented and continuous forests? (2) Are recruitment rates influenced by fragment area, age, and proximity of forest edge? (3) Are regenerating trees in fragments biased toward successional species or against old‐growth species? Methods Study Area

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Apr 26, 1998

References

  • Effects of forest fragmentation on mortality and damage of selected trees in central Amazonia
    Ferreira, Ferreira; Laurance, Laurance
  • A century of plant species loss from an isolated fragment of lowland tropical rain forest
    Turner, Turner; Chua, Chua; Ong, Ong; Soong, Soong; Tan, Tan

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off