Effects of forest fertilization on the radial growth and resin exudation of insect‐defoliated Scots pines

Effects of forest fertilization on the radial growth and resin exudation of insect‐defoliated... Summary 1. Scots pine trees that had been defoliated by the pine sawfly Diprion pini were fertilized with various nutrient combinations in the growing season following defoliation in order to study the possibility of accelerating tree recovery. Resin exudation, vertical resin duct density and vigour index of the trees were measured 3 years after defoliation, and radial growth 6 years after defoliation. 2. Defoliation reduced stem growth, and annual rings were missing particularly in the severely defoliated trees. Nitrogen fertilization enhanced radial growth even in the severely defoliated trees. 3. Nitrogen fertilization increased the number of vertical resin ducts in both defoliated and undefoliated trees, but resin duct density tended to be lower in the nitrogen‐fertilized trees than in trees that had not received nitrogen fertilizer. Resin duct density did not correlate with resin flow rate. 4. Resin exudation was strongest from trees that had been almost totally defoliated, intermediate from trees that had lost half of their foliage, and weakest from undefoliated trees, indicating that defoliation had induced resin production in the stem. Resin flow was not affected by fertilization. 5. There was a weak negative correlation between vigour index and resin flow. No trees with a high vigour index had strong resin exudation, while resin exudation varied from minimal to very strong in trees with a low vigour index. 6. The results indicate that nitrogen fertilization can be used to stimulate growth of defoliated trees without affecting resistance traits on infertile sites. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Ecology Wiley

Effects of forest fertilization on the radial growth and resin exudation of insect‐defoliated Scots pines

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0021-8901
eISSN
1365-2664
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-2664.1999.00442.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary 1. Scots pine trees that had been defoliated by the pine sawfly Diprion pini were fertilized with various nutrient combinations in the growing season following defoliation in order to study the possibility of accelerating tree recovery. Resin exudation, vertical resin duct density and vigour index of the trees were measured 3 years after defoliation, and radial growth 6 years after defoliation. 2. Defoliation reduced stem growth, and annual rings were missing particularly in the severely defoliated trees. Nitrogen fertilization enhanced radial growth even in the severely defoliated trees. 3. Nitrogen fertilization increased the number of vertical resin ducts in both defoliated and undefoliated trees, but resin duct density tended to be lower in the nitrogen‐fertilized trees than in trees that had not received nitrogen fertilizer. Resin duct density did not correlate with resin flow rate. 4. Resin exudation was strongest from trees that had been almost totally defoliated, intermediate from trees that had lost half of their foliage, and weakest from undefoliated trees, indicating that defoliation had induced resin production in the stem. Resin flow was not affected by fertilization. 5. There was a weak negative correlation between vigour index and resin flow. No trees with a high vigour index had strong resin exudation, while resin exudation varied from minimal to very strong in trees with a low vigour index. 6. The results indicate that nitrogen fertilization can be used to stimulate growth of defoliated trees without affecting resistance traits on infertile sites.

Journal

Journal of Applied EcologyWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1999

References

  • Effects of vitality fertilization on the resin flow and vigour of Scots pine in Finland.
    Kytö, Kytö; Niemelä, Niemelä; Annila, Annila

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