Effect of Laser Shock Peening on the Microstructures and Properties of Oxide‐Dispersion‐Strengthened Austenitic Steels

Effect of Laser Shock Peening on the Microstructures and Properties of... IntroductionOxide‐dispersion‐strengthened (ODS) steels have a homogeneous dispersion of nanoscale oxide particles (e.g., Y2Ti2O7 and Y2TiO5) in the steel matrix. Compared to conventional steels, ODS steels have improved thermomechanical and irradiation properties. Most ODS steels have a ferritic steel matrix and few ODS steels are austenitic. ODS ferritic steels have been prevalently studied in the nuclear community leading to the development of many alloys such as 14YWT, 12YWT, MA956, MA957, and PM2000. ODS austenitic steels, such as ODS 316, ODS 310, and ODS 304, have been recently developed for next‐generation fossil and nuclear energy systems, such as the very‐high‐temperature reactors (VHTR). Generally, austenitic steels have better creep resistance than ferritic steels, because the close‐packed face‐centered cubic (FCC) structure is more stable and more resistant to creep than the body‐centered cubic (BCC) structure at high temperatures. On the other hand, ferritic steels have better void swelling resistance than austenitic steels, because the BCC structure results in a reduction of dislocation bias and increased self‐diffusion, which are beneficial for reduced radiation swelling. The void swelling resistance of austenitic steels could be increased by the dispersion of oxide nanoparticles inside the matrix. The particle/matrix interfaces in ODS austenitic steels can act as nanoscale http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Advanced Engineering Materials Wiley

Effect of Laser Shock Peening on the Microstructures and Properties of Oxide‐Dispersion‐Strengthened Austenitic Steels

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim
ISSN
1438-1656
eISSN
1527-2648
D.O.I.
10.1002/adem.201700641
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionOxide‐dispersion‐strengthened (ODS) steels have a homogeneous dispersion of nanoscale oxide particles (e.g., Y2Ti2O7 and Y2TiO5) in the steel matrix. Compared to conventional steels, ODS steels have improved thermomechanical and irradiation properties. Most ODS steels have a ferritic steel matrix and few ODS steels are austenitic. ODS ferritic steels have been prevalently studied in the nuclear community leading to the development of many alloys such as 14YWT, 12YWT, MA956, MA957, and PM2000. ODS austenitic steels, such as ODS 316, ODS 310, and ODS 304, have been recently developed for next‐generation fossil and nuclear energy systems, such as the very‐high‐temperature reactors (VHTR). Generally, austenitic steels have better creep resistance than ferritic steels, because the close‐packed face‐centered cubic (FCC) structure is more stable and more resistant to creep than the body‐centered cubic (BCC) structure at high temperatures. On the other hand, ferritic steels have better void swelling resistance than austenitic steels, because the BCC structure results in a reduction of dislocation bias and increased self‐diffusion, which are beneficial for reduced radiation swelling. The void swelling resistance of austenitic steels could be increased by the dispersion of oxide nanoparticles inside the matrix. The particle/matrix interfaces in ODS austenitic steels can act as nanoscale

Journal

Advanced Engineering MaterialsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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