EFFECT OF CULTURAL PRACTICES ON CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF PROCESSING VEGETABLES. A Review.

EFFECT OF CULTURAL PRACTICES ON CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF PROCESSING VEGETABLES. A Review. ENGINEERING ~ c. Y. Lee York State Agricultural Cornell University, Experiment Geneva, NY Station 14456 EFFECT OF CULTURAL PRACTICES ON CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF PROCESSING VEGETABLES. A Review. INTRODUCTION THERE HAS BEEN an increased interest in the nutrient composition of food over the past 6 or 7 yr. More recently, this concern over nutrition and nutrients in our food has given impetus to requirements for nutritional labeling of food products. Recent federal regulations covering nutritional labeling and tolerance for toxic substances in foods have brought great concern to the food industry, the major problem being variability in fresh and processed products. Chemical composition of processed vegetables at the time they are consumed is determined by a large number of factors. Some of these are processing, handling, storage, etc., which follow harvesting. In the first place, the chemical constituents of the vegetables as they are produced at the field is important. Bearing directly on this subject are the influences of agricultural and cultural variables, such as variety, location, soil, climate, maturity at harvest and the type and amount of fertilizer, pesticide, herbicide, etc., on chemical composition of fresh crops. Since some of these factors are interrelated in a complicated manner http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Food Science Wiley

EFFECT OF CULTURAL PRACTICES ON CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF PROCESSING VEGETABLES. A Review.

Journal of Food Science, Volume 39 (6) – Nov 1, 1974

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1974 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1147
eISSN
1750-3841
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-2621.1974.tb07322.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ENGINEERING ~ c. Y. Lee York State Agricultural Cornell University, Experiment Geneva, NY Station 14456 EFFECT OF CULTURAL PRACTICES ON CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF PROCESSING VEGETABLES. A Review. INTRODUCTION THERE HAS BEEN an increased interest in the nutrient composition of food over the past 6 or 7 yr. More recently, this concern over nutrition and nutrients in our food has given impetus to requirements for nutritional labeling of food products. Recent federal regulations covering nutritional labeling and tolerance for toxic substances in foods have brought great concern to the food industry, the major problem being variability in fresh and processed products. Chemical composition of processed vegetables at the time they are consumed is determined by a large number of factors. Some of these are processing, handling, storage, etc., which follow harvesting. In the first place, the chemical constituents of the vegetables as they are produced at the field is important. Bearing directly on this subject are the influences of agricultural and cultural variables, such as variety, location, soil, climate, maturity at harvest and the type and amount of fertilizer, pesticide, herbicide, etc., on chemical composition of fresh crops. Since some of these factors are interrelated in a complicated manner

Journal

Journal of Food ScienceWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1974

References

  • Effect of stage of maturity of the snap bean on its composition and use as a food product
    Culpepper, Culpepper
  • Nitrogen fertilization and the formation of 2‐pyrrolidone‐5‐carboxylic acid in stored and processed table beets
    Lee, Lee; Shallenberger, Shallenberger; Acree, Acree

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