Effect of boundary layer conductance on the response of stomata to humidity

Effect of boundary layer conductance on the response of stomata to humidity Abstract. Leaf conductance responses to leaf to air water vapour partial pressure difference (VPD) have been measured at air speeds of 0.5 and 3.0 ms−1 in single attached leaves of three species in order to test the hypothesis that leaf conductance response to VPD is controlled by evaporation from the outer surface of the epidermis, rather than by evaporation through stomata. Total conductance decreased linearly with increassing VPD at both air speeds, but was decreased 1.6 3.0 times as much as by a given incrase in VPD at high than at low air speed. depending on species. In all species the relationship between leaf conductance and the gradient for evaporation from the epidermis was the same at both values of boundary layer conductance, supporting the hypothesis that direct epidermal evaporation controls stomatal guard cell behaviour in responses of stomata to VPD in these species. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell & Environment Wiley

Effect of boundary layer conductance on the response of stomata to humidity

Plant Cell & Environment, Volume 8 (1) – Jan 1, 1985

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0140-7791
eISSN
1365-3040
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-3040.1985.tb01209.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Leaf conductance responses to leaf to air water vapour partial pressure difference (VPD) have been measured at air speeds of 0.5 and 3.0 ms−1 in single attached leaves of three species in order to test the hypothesis that leaf conductance response to VPD is controlled by evaporation from the outer surface of the epidermis, rather than by evaporation through stomata. Total conductance decreased linearly with increassing VPD at both air speeds, but was decreased 1.6 3.0 times as much as by a given incrase in VPD at high than at low air speed. depending on species. In all species the relationship between leaf conductance and the gradient for evaporation from the epidermis was the same at both values of boundary layer conductance, supporting the hypothesis that direct epidermal evaporation controls stomatal guard cell behaviour in responses of stomata to VPD in these species.

Journal

Plant Cell & EnvironmentWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1985

References

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